Etymology
Advertisement
begorra (interj.)
1839, antiquated Anglo-Irish form of expletive By God.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
sorceress (n.)
late 14c., from Anglo-French sorceresse, from sorcer (see sorcerer).
Related entries & more 
WASP (n.)
acronym for White Anglo-Saxon Protestant, by 1955.
Related entries & more 
surmountable (adj.)
late 15c., from Anglo-French sormuntable; see surmount + -able.
Related entries & more 
draper (n.)

late 14c. (mid-14c. in Anglo-French; mid-12c. as a surname), "one who weaves and/or sells cloth," from Anglo-French draper, Old French drapier (13c.) "draper, clothes-seller, clothes-maker," agent noun from drap "cloth" (see drape (v.)).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Lewis 
masc. proper name, Anglo-French form of French Louis (see Louis).
Related entries & more 
Ulster 
northernmost of the four provinces of Ireland, 14c., from Anglo-French Ulvestre (early 13c.), Anglo-Latin Ulvestera (c. 1200), corresponding to Old Norse Ulfastir, probably from Irish Ulaidh "men of Ulster" + suffix also found in Leinster, Munster, and perhaps representing Irish tir "land."
Related entries & more 
concordat (n.)

"agreement between church and state on a mutual matter," 1610s, from French concordat (16c.), from Medieval Latin concordatum, noun use of Latin concordatum, neuter past participle of concordare "to agree," from concors (genitive concordis) "of one mind" (see concord (n.)).

The most celebrated modern concordat is that concluded in 1801 between Napoleon Bonaparte as first consul and Pius VII., defining the restored privileges of the Roman Catholic Church in France, and regulating in detail the relations between the ecclesiastical and civil powers. [Century Dictionary]
Related entries & more 
asperges (n.)

sprinkling ritual of the Catholic church, also an antiphon intoned or sung during this, 1550s, from Late Latin asperges, noun use of 2nd person singular future indicative of Latin aspergere "to scatter, strew upon, sprinkle," from ad "to" (see ad-) + spargere "to sprinkle" (see sparse). The word is taken from the phrase Asperges me, Domine, hyssopo et mundabor, from the 51st Psalm (Vulgate), sung during the rite of sprinkling a congregation with holy water. Old English used onstregdan as a loan-translation of Latin aspergere.

Related entries & more 
la (3)
Anglo-Saxon interjection of mild wonder or surprise, or grief; "oh, ah, indeed, verily."
Related entries & more 

Page 7