Etymology
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mooreeffoc (n.)

"coffee-room, viewed from the inside through a glass door, as it was seen by Dickens on a dark London day; ... used by Chesterton to denote the queerness of things that have become trite, when they are seen suddenly from a new angle." [J.R.R. Tolkien, "On Fairy Stories"]

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parallax (n.)

"apparent displacement of an object observed, due to an actual displacement of the observer," 1570s, from French parallaxe (mid-16c.), from Greek parallaxis "change, alteration, inclination of two lines meeting at an angle," from parallassein "to alter, make things alternate," from para- (see para- (1)) + allassein "to change," from allos "other" (from PIE root *al- "beyond"). Related: Parallactic.

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acclinal (adj.)

in geology, "leaning against," as one stratum of rock against another, both turned up at an angle, 1837, from Latin acclinis "leaning on or against," related to acclinare "to lean on or against," from assimilated form of ad "to, upon" (see ad-) + clinare "to bend" (from PIE *klein-, suffixed form of root *klei- "to lean").

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kern (n.)
1680s, "part of a metal type projecting beyond the body," as the head of an -f- or the tail of a -j-. According to Century Dictionary this is identical with kern "a grain" (see kernel), but OED says it is from French carne "projecting angle, quill of a pen" (12c.), Old North French form of Old French charne "hinge, pivot," from Latin cardinem "hinge." Related: Kerned "having the top or bottom projecting beyond the body;" kerning.
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kneel (v.)
Old English cneowlian "to kneel, fall on the knees," from Proto-Germanic *knewljan (source also of Middle Low German knelen, Middle Dutch cnielen, Dutch knielen Gothic knussjan), from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle." Past tense knelt is a modern formation (19c.) on analogy of feel/felt, etc. Related: Kneeler; kneeling.
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bight (n.)
Old English byht "bend, angle, corner," from Proto-Germanic *buhtiz (source also of Middle Low German bucht, German Bucht, Dutch bocht, Danish bught "bight, bay"), from PIE root *bheug- "to bend," with derivatives referring to bent, pliable, or curved objects. Sense of "long, narrow indentation on a coastline" is from late 15c.
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Hamburg 
German city, the -burg is German Burg "fort," in reference to the moated castle built there c. 825; the first element is perhaps Old High German hamma "ham, back of the knee" in a transferred sense of "bend, angle," with reference to its position on a river bend promontory; or Middle High German hamme "enclosed area of pastureland."
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mortar (n.3)

"short cannon, ordnance piece short in proportion to the size of its bore," fired at a high angle and meant to secure a vertical fall of the projectile, 1620s, originally mortar-piece (1550s), from French mortier "short cannon," in Old French, "bowl for mixing or pounding" (see mortar (n.2)). So called for its shape.

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genuflection (n.)

"act of bending the knee," especially in worship, early 15c., genu-fleccion, from Medieval Latin genuflectionem (nominative genuflexio) "bending of the knee," noun of action from past-participle stem of Late Latin genuflectere "genuflect," properly genu flectere "to bend the knee," from Latin genu "knee" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle") + flectere "to bend" (see flexible).

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*keg- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "hook, tooth."

It forms all or part of: hacek; hack (v.1) "to cut roughly, cut with chopping blows;" hake; Hakenkreuz; heckle; hook; hooker.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Russian kogot "claw;" Old English hoc "hook, angle."
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