Etymology
Advertisement
task (n.)
early 14c., "a quantity of labor imposed as a duty," from Old North French tasque (12c., Old French tasche, Modern French tâche) "duty, tax," from Vulgar Latin *tasca "a duty, assessment," metathesis of Medieval Latin taxa, a back-formation of Latin taxare "to evaluate, estimate, assess" (see tax (v.)). General sense of "any piece of work that has to be done" is first recorded 1590s. Phrase take one to task (1680s) preserves the sense that is closer to tax.

German tasche "pocket" is from the same Vulgar Latin source (via Old High German tasca), with presumable sense evolution from "amount of work imposed by some authority," to "payment for that work," to "wages," to "pocket into which money is put," to "any pocket."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
well-heeled (adj.)
"well-off, having much money, in good circumstances;" also "well-equipped," 1872, American English slang (originally in the "money" sense), from well (adv.) + colloquial sense of heeled. "[A]pplied to a player at cards who has a good hand, to a person who possesses plenty of money, or to a man who is well armed" [Century Dictionary]. From 1817 in a literal sense, in reference to shoes.
Related entries & more 
payee (n.)

"person to whom money is paid," 1758, from pay (v.) + -ee.

Related entries & more 
arithmocracy (n.)
"rule by numerical majority," 1850, from Greek arithmos "number, counting, amount" (see arithmetic) + -cracy "rule or government by." Related: Arithmocratic; arithmocratical.
Related entries & more 
purse (v.)

c. 1300, pursen, "put (money) in a purse;" c. 1600 as "draw together and wrinkle" (as the strings of a money bag), from purse (n.). For sense, compare pucker (v.), probably from poke "bag, sack." Related: Pursed; pursing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
rental (n.)

late 14c., "rent roll, schedule or account of rents;" also "income from rents," from Anglo-French rental and Medieval Latin rentale; see rent (n.1) + -al (2). Meaning "amount charged for rent, gross amount of rents drawn from an estate" is from 1630s. In reference to a car or house let for rent, by 1952, American English. As an adjective by 1510s.

Related entries & more 
somewhat (adv.)
c. 1200, "in a certain amount, to a certain degree," from some + what. Replaced Old English sumdæl, sume dæle "somewhat, some portion," literally "some deal."
Related entries & more 
rainfall (n.)

also rain-fall, by 1850 as "amount of precipitation that falls as rain, from rain (n.) + fall (n.). By 1858 as "a falling of rain."

Related entries & more 
savings (n.)

"money saved," 1737, plural of saving (n.), which see.

Related entries & more 

Page 7