Etymology
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well-heeled (adj.)
"well-off, having much money, in good circumstances;" also "well-equipped," 1872, American English slang (originally in the "money" sense), from well (adv.) + colloquial sense of heeled. "[A]pplied to a player at cards who has a good hand, to a person who possesses plenty of money, or to a man who is well armed" [Century Dictionary]. From 1817 in a literal sense, in reference to shoes.
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shrinkage (n.)
1713, "act or fact of shrinking," from shrink (v.) + -age. Meaning "amount by which something has shrunk" is from 1862.
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purse (v.)

c. 1300, pursen, "put (money) in a purse;" c. 1600 as "draw together and wrinkle" (as the strings of a money bag), from purse (n.). For sense, compare pucker (v.), probably from poke "bag, sack." Related: Pursed; pursing.

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rental (n.)

late 14c., "rent roll, schedule or account of rents;" also "income from rents," from Anglo-French rental and Medieval Latin rentale; see rent (n.1) + -al (2). Meaning "amount charged for rent, gross amount of rents drawn from an estate" is from 1630s. In reference to a car or house let for rent, by 1952, American English. As an adjective by 1510s.

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worth (n.)
Old English weorþ "value, price, price paid; worth, worthiness, merit; equivalent value amount, monetary value," from worth (adj.). From c. 1200 as "excellence, nobility."
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arithmocracy (n.)
"rule by numerical majority," 1850, from Greek arithmos "number, counting, amount" (see arithmetic) + -cracy "rule or government by." Related: Arithmocratic; arithmocratical.
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B.T.U. 

1889 as an abbreviation of British Thermal Unit (1862), a commercial unit of electrical energy (the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit); the French Thermal Unit is the amount of heat required to raise 1 kilogram of water 1 degree centigrade. Also from 1889 as an abbreviation of Board of Trade Unit, in electicity "1,000 watt hours."

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savings (n.)

"money saved," 1737, plural of saving (n.), which see.

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spending (n.)
late Old English, verbal noun from spend (v.). Spending-money is from 1590s.
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