Etymology
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parochialism (n.)

"limited and narrow character or tendency, provincialism, narrow-mindedness and uncuriosity about the wider world," 1847, from parochial + -ism.

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promenade (v.)

"to make a promenade; walk about for amusement, display, or exercise," 1580s, from promenade (n.). Related: Promenaded; promenading.

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environs (n.)
"outskirts," 1660s, from French environs, plural of Old French environ "compass, circuit," from environ (adv.) "around, round about" (see environ).
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short-timer (n.)
"one whose term or enlistment is about to expire," 1906, from short (adj.) + time (n.) + agent noun ending -er (1).
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encompass (v.)

"form a circle about, encircle," 1550s, from en- (1) "make, put in" + compass (n.). Related: Encompassed; encompasses; encompassing.

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procure (v.)

c. 1300, "bring about, cause, effect," from Old French procurer "care for, be occupied with; bring about, cause; acquire, provide" (13c.) and directly from Late Latin procurare "manage, take care of;" from pro "in behalf of" (see pro-) + curare "care for" (see cure (v.)).

The main modern sense of "obtain; recruit" (late 14c.) is via the meaning "take pains to get or bring about" (mid-14c.). It had broader meanings in Middle English: to procure to slay was "cause to be slain;" procure to break, "cause to be broken," etc. The meaning "to obtain (women) for sexual gratification" of others is attested from c. 1600. Related: Procured; procuring.

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initiand (n.)
"one about to be initiated," 1913, from Latin initiand, gerundive of initiare "to begin, initiate; instruct in mysteries" (see initiate (v.)).
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riverman (n.)

also river-man, "waterman, one who frequents a river and makes a livelihood about it," 1722, from river (n.) + man (n.).

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forage (v.)

early 15c., "to plunder, pillage," from forage (n.) or from French fourrager. Meaning "hunt about for" is from 1768. Related: Foraged; foraging.

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boulevardier (n.)
1856, a French word in English, "one who frequents the boulevard;" i.e. "man-about-town, one fond of urban living and society."
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