Etymology
Advertisement
dead end (n.)

"closed end of a passage," 1851 in reference to drainpipes, 1874 in reference to railway lines; by 1886 of streets; from dead (adj.) + end (n.). Figurative use, "course of action that leads nowhere," is by 1914. As an adjective in the figurative sense by 1917; as a verb by 1921. Related: Dead-ended; dead-ending; deadender (by 1996).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
palatal (adj.)

1728, of sounds, "uttered by the aid of the palate," from palate + -al (1). By 1786 as "of or pertaining to the roof of the mouth." As a noun, "a sound or letter usually produced by the upper surface of the tongue against a part of the palate," by 1762.

Related entries & more 
average (adj.)
1770, "estimated by averaging," from average (n.). By 1803 as "equal in amount to the sum of all particular quantities divided by the number of them," hence "of medium character."
Related entries & more 
lawn-mower (n.)
1853 as a type of machine to cut grass, from lawn (n.1) + mower. Originally pushed by hand or drawn by horses, later also powered by a motor.
Related entries & more 
frank (n.)
short for frankfurter, by 1916, American English. Franks and beans attested by 1953.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
nudification (n.)

"a making naked," by 1838, perhaps from French nudification (by 1833); see nude + -fication.

Related entries & more 
moorings (n.)

1744, "ropes, etc., by which a floating thing is confined or made fast," from mooring. Figurative sense of "that to which anything is fastened or by which it is held" is by 1851.

Related entries & more 
aggro (n.)
by 1969, originally British underworld and juvenile delinquent slang, short for aggravation in a colloquial sense "trouble or disturbance provoked by aggressive behavior or harassment" (by 1939).
Related entries & more 
photography (n.)

"the art of producing images by application of chemical changes produced by certain substances by the action of light or other radiant energy," 1839, from photo- + -graphy. See photograph.

Related entries & more 
manually (adv.)

"by hand, by means of the hand," late 15c., from manual (adj.) + -ly (2).

Related entries & more 

Page 7