Etymology
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ideologue (n.)
1815, in reference to the French Revolutionaries, from French ideologue, from Greek idea (see idea) + -logos (see -logy). Earlier form was ideologist (1798).
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lithology (n.)
"the study of rock-formation," a branch of geology, 1716, from Modern Latin lithologia, from litho- "rock" + -logia "study of" (see -logy). Related: Lithologic; lithologically; lithologist.
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tetralogy (n.)
1650s, from Greek tetralogia, from tetra- "four" (from PIE root *kwetwer- "four") + -logia (see -logy). A group of four dramatic compositions, originally three tragedies (the trilogia) and a Satyric play.
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onomatology (n.)

"the science of the rules observed in the formation of a name or names," 1790; from Greek onomat-, stem of onoma "word, name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name") + -logy. Related: Onomatologist.

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thanatology (n.)
"scientific study of death," 1837, from thanato- "death" + -logy. In 1970s, some undertakers made a bid to be called thanatologists; but from 1974 that word has been used principally in reference to specialists in the needs of the terminally ill.
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rhinology (n.)

"sum of scientific knowledge concerning the nose" [Century Dictionary]; by 1838, but as "science of divining characters by the dimensions of the nose," from rhino- "nose" + -logy "study of." As a branch of medicine concerned with nasal and sinus problems, by 1874. Related: Rhinological; rhinologist.

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sociology (n.)
the science of social phenomena, 1842, from French sociologie, a hybrid coined 1830 by French philosopher Isidore Auguste Comte (1798-1857), from Latin socius "associate" (see social (adj.)) + Greek-derived suffix -logie (see -logy).
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nosology (n.)

"study of diseases, systematic classification of diseases," 1721, from Modern Latin nosologia (perhaps via French nosologie); see noso- "disease" + -logy "study of." Related: Nosological; nosologist.

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battology (n.)
"needless repetition in speaking or writing," c. 1600, from Greek battologia "a speaking stammeringly," from battos "stammerer," of imitative origin, + -logia (see -logy). Related: Battological; battologist.
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agriology (n.)
study of prehistoric human customs, 1878, from agrio-, from Greek agrios "wild," literally "living in the fields," from agros "field" (from PIE root *agro- "field") + -logy. Related: Agriologist (n., 1875); agriological.
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