Etymology
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carol (v.)
c. 1300, "to dance in a ring," from Old French caroler, from carole (see carol (n.)). As "to sing with joy or festivity" from late 14c. As "go around from place to place in a group singing Christmas carols" it is from 1879, said to be a revival of an old English custom. Related: Caroled; caroling; caroler.
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carol (n.)
c. 1300, "joyful song," also a kind of dance in a ring, from Old French carole "kind of dance in a ring, round dance accompanied by singers," a word of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Medieval Latin choraula "a dance to the flute," from Latin choraules "flute-player," from Greek khoraules "flute player who accompanies the choral dance," from khoros "chorus" (see chorus) + aulein "to play the flute," from aulos "reed instrument" (see alveolus). OED writes that "a Celtic origin is out of the question." The meaning "Christmas hymn of joy" is attested from c. 1500.
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Carolina 
1663, North American colony named for King Charles II (the Latin form of the male proper name is Carolus). Earlier French colonists had called the region Caroline (1564) in honor of Charles IX, King of France, and a 1629 grant here by Charles I of England was named Carolana.

The name at first referred to modern South Carolina, but the tract originally included North Carolina and Georgia; North Carolina first was used 1691, in reference to settlements made from Virginia. The official division into north and south dates from 1710. Used generically in forming species names in botany and zoology from 1734. Related: Carolinian.
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Caroline 
fem. proper name, from French, from Italian Carolina, originally a fem. adjective from Medieval Latin Carolus "Charles" (see Charles).
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caroline (adj.)
1650s, "of or pertaining to a Charles," from French, from Medieval Latin Carolus "Charles" (a name from the common Germanic noun meaning "man, husband;" see carl). Especially of Charlemagne, or, in English history, Charles I and Charles II.
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caroling (n.)
c. 1300, "a round dance accompanied by singing," verbal noun from carol (v.). As "a going from place to place in a group singing Christmas carols" by 1879.
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Carolingian (adj.)
1881, "belonging to the Frankish royal and imperial dynasty founded by Charles Martel, from Medieval Latin Carolus "Charles" (a name from the common Germanic noun meaning "man, husband;" see carl). Also compare Carlovingian.
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carom (v.)
1860, "to strike or collide with a thing and then rebound or glance off," from carom (n.). Related: Caromed; caroming.
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carom (n.)

1779, "the hitting of two or three balls in succession by the cue ball at a single stroke," a shortening and alteration of carambole (1775), from French carambole "the red ball in billiards," from Spanish carombola "the red ball in billiards," perhaps originally "fruit of the tropical Asian carambola tree," which is round and orange and supposed to resemble a red billiard ball; from Marathi (southern Indian) karambal:

If the Striker hits the Red and his Adversary's Ball with his own Ball he played with, he wins two Points; which Stroke is called a Carambole, or for Shortness, a Carrom. ["Hoyle's Games Improved," London, 1779]
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carotene (n.)
orange-colored hydrocarbon found in carrots and other plants, 1861, from German carotin, coined 1831 by German chemist H.W.F. Wackenroder (1789-1854) from Latin carota "carrot" (see carrot) + German form of chemical suffix -ine (2), denoting a hydrocarbon.
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