Etymology
Advertisement
antique (n.)
1520s, "a relic of antiquity," from antique (adj.). From 1771 as "an old and collectible thing."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
anythingarian (n.)
"one indifferent to religious creeds, one 'that always make their interest the standard of their religion,'" 1704, originally dismissive, from anything on model of trinitarian, unitarian, etc.
Related entries & more 
analogical (adj.)
"done by or of the nature of an analogy," 1580s in mathematics; c. 1600 in general use; see analogy + -ical.
Related entries & more 
Anglo-Latin (n.)
Medieval Latin as written in England, 1791, from Anglo- + Latin (n.).
Related entries & more 
anthropophobia (n.)
"fear of man," 1841 (from 1798 in German); see anthropo- + -phobia.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
anti-fascist (adj.)
1923, in names of organizations of Italian workers in the U.S., from anti- + fascist.
Related entries & more 
Anti-Mason (n.)
by 1928 in reference to a U.S. third political party formed in opposition to elites and for a time powerful in the mid-Atlantic states, from anti- + Mason, in reference to the secret society. Related: Anti-Masonic.
Related entries & more 
anti-socialist (adj.)
also antisocialist, 1841, "opposed to socialism;" see anti- + socialist.
Related entries & more 
antichthon (n.)

c. 1600, antichthones (plural), from Latin antichthontes, from Greek antikhthontes "people of the opposite hemisphere," from anti "opposite" (see anti-) + khthōn "land, earth, soil" (from PIE root *dhghem- "earth"). In Pythagorean philosophy, an imagined invisible double of earth.

Related entries & more 
antoecian (adj.)

"pertaining to the people dwelling on the opposite side of the earth," 1860, from antoeci (plural) "people dwelling on the opposite side of the earth" (1620s), a Latinized form of Greek antoikoi, literally "dwellers opposite," from anti "opposite" (see anti-) + oikein "to dwell" (from PIE root *weik- (1) "clan").

Related entries & more 

Page 60