Etymology
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catch-up (n.)

"a working to overtake a leading rival," by 1971, probably a figurative use from U.S. football in reference to being behind in the score. The verbal phrase catch up was used from early 14c. in the sense of "raise aloft," it is attested from c. 1400 as "to take up suddenly," and by 1846 in the sense of "get to the same point, overtake;" see catch (v.) + up (adv.).

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re-up (v.)

"re-enlist," by 1906, U.S. armed forces slang, from re- "back, again" + up (v.) "enlist." Related: Re-upped; re-upping.

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dust-up (n.)

also dustup, "fight, quarrel, disturbance," 1897, from dust + up; perhaps from dust "confusion, disturbance" (1590s), also compare kick up a dust "cause an uproar" (1753). To dust (someone's) coat was ironical for "to beat (someone) soundly" (1680s).

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get-up (n.)

also getup, 1847, "equipment, costume," from get (v.) + up (adv.). Meaning "initiative, energy" recorded from 1841. The verbal phrase is recorded from mid-14c. as "to rise."

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runner-up (n.)

1842, originally in dog racing, "dog that loses only the final race;" see runner + up. The more general sense of "team or competitor that takes second place" is from 1885.

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lace-up (adj.)

1831, originally of boots, from the verbal phrase, from lace (v.) + up (adv.).

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leg up (n.)

"an aid, a boost," 1837, from leg (n.) + up (adv.).

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lead-up (n.)

1917, from verbal phrase; see lead (v.1) + up (adv.). To lead up to "prepare gradually for" is from 1861.

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lock-up (n.)

also lockup, "detention cell for offenders," 1838, perhaps short for earlier lock-up house; from the verbal phrase. Meaning "action of locking up" is from 1845. The verbal phrase lock (someone) up in a dwelling, prison, etc., is from early 15c. Of things, "to hold in safekeeping or concealment," also early 15c. See lock (v.) + up (adv.). To lock up (intransitive) "lock all the doors" (of a house, shop, etc.) is from 1901.

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moon-up (n.)

"moonrise," U.S. dialectal, 1907, from moon (n.) probably based on sun-up (q.v.).

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