Etymology
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glair (n.)
white of an egg (used as a varnish), c. 1300, from Old French glaire "white of egg, slime, mucus" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *claria (ovi) "white part (of an egg)," from Latin clarus "bright, clear" (see clear (adj.)). Related: Glaireous.
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Oreo (n.)

 type of cookie (made by Nabisco), 1912; the source of the name has been forgotten. As a derogatory word for "black person felt to have a 'white' mentality," 1968, African-American vernacular, from the snack cookies, which consist of dark chocolate wafers and white sugar cream filling (hence "brown outside, white inside"). Compare radish-communist (1920), one who proclaims enthusiasm for the Party but privately opposes it, on the notion of red outside, white inside.

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jerky (n.)
1850, American English, from American Spanish charqui "jerked meat," from Quechua (Inca) ch'arki "dried flesh."
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*arg- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to shine; white," hence "silver" as the shining or white metal.

It forms all or part of: argent; Argentina; argentine; Argo; argue; Argus; hydrargyrum; litharge.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit rajata-, Avestan erezata-, Old Persian ardata-, Armenian arcat, Greek arguron, Latin argentum, Old Irish argat, Breton arc'hant "silver;" Sanskrit arjuna- "white, shining;" Hittite harki- "white;" Greek argos "white."
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shish kebab (n.)
1914, from Armenian shish kabab, from Turkish siskebap, from sis "skewer" + kebap "roast meat."
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taco (n.)
tortilla filled with spiced meat, etc., 1949, from Mexican Spanish, "light lunch," literally "plug, wadding."
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albumen (n.)
1590s, "white of an egg," from Latin albumen (ovi) "white (of an egg)," literally "whiteness," from the neuter of albus "white" (see alb). The organic substance (which exists nearly pure in egg whites) so called from 1800, also known as albumin (1869, from French albumine).
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blaze (v.3)
"to mark" (a tree, a trail), usually by cutting of a piece of bark so as to leave a white spot, 1750, American English, from blaze (n.) "white mark made on a tree" (1660s), from blaze (n.2).
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pot-liquor (n.)

"liquid in which meat has been boiled," 1744, from pot (n.1) + liquor (n.).

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