Etymology
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outface (v.)

1520s, "to confront boldly, stare down and shame;" 1570s, "confront fearlessly," from out- + face (v.). Related: Outfaced; outfacing.

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smiley (adj.)
also smily, "inclined to smile," 1848, from smile (n.) + -y (2). Smiley-face (n.) is from 1981; as a computer icon from 1987.
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brave (v.)
"to face with bravery," 1761, from French braver, from brave "valiant" (see brave (adj.)). Related: Braved; braving.
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compact (n.2)

"small make-up case," 1919, from compact (adj.), based on its containing compacted face powder.

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beaver (n.2)
"lower face-guard of a helmet," early 15c., from Old French baviere, originally "child's bib," from bave "saliva."
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mug (v.2)

"make exaggerated facial expressions," 1855, originally theatrical slang, from mug (n.2) "face." Related: Mugged; mugging.

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prosopagnosia (n.)

"inability to recognize faces," 1950, Medical Latin from German prosopagnosie (1948), from Greek prosopon "face" (see prosopopeia) + agnosia "ignorance" (see agnostic).

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confrontation (n.)

1630s, "action of bringing two parties face to face," for examination and discovery of the truth, from Medieval Latin confrontationem (nominative confrontatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of confrontari, from assimilated form of Latin com "with, together" (see con-) + frontem (nominative frons) "forehead" (see front (n.)). International political sense is attested from 1963 and traces to the "Cuban missile crisis" of the previous year.

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straight-faced (adj.)
1938, of persons, "with visage showing no emotion or reaction," from expression keep a straight face (1897), from straight (adj.).
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physiognomy (n.)

late 14c., phisonomie, "art of judging characters from facial features," from Old French fisonomie, phizonomie and directly from Medieval Latin physonomia, from Late Latin physiognomia, from Greek physiognōmia "the judging of a person's nature by his features," from physio- (see physio-) + gnōmōn (genitive gnōmōnos) "a judge, interpreter, indicator" (from PIE root *gno- "to know"). The meaning "face, countenance, the human face and its expressions" is from c. 1400. Related: Physiognomical.

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