Etymology
Advertisement
Pisgah 

name of the mountain east of the River Jordan, whence Moses was allowed to view the Promised Land he could not enter (Deuteronomy iii.27); with figurative use from 1640s. The name is Hebrew, literally "cleft."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
negativism (n.)

1824, "the policy of opposition;" see negative (adj.) + -ism. Or, specifically, "the views of a negationist" (one who simply denies beliefs commonly held without asserting an opposite view). Related: Negativistic.

Related entries & more 
disclosure (n.)

1590s, "act of opening up to view, a making known or revealing;" see disclose + -ure. Formed in English, perhaps on model of closure. Meaning "that which is disclosed or made known" is by 1825.

Related entries & more 
interlope (v.)

"intrude where one has no business," especially with a view to gain the advantage or profits of another (as a trader without a proper licence), early 17c., probably a back-formation from interloper (q.v.). Related: Interloped; interloping.

Related entries & more 
retouch (v.)

"amend or improve by fresh touches," 1680s, from French retoucher (13c.) "to touch again" (with a view to improving), from re- "again" (see re-) + toucher (see touch (v.)). Related: Retouched; retouching; retoucher.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
scenery (n.)

"decoration of a theater stage, disposition and succession of scenes in a play," 1770 (in a figurative sense), earlier scenary; see scene + -ery. Meaning "a landscape or view, general appearance of a place considered as a pictorial scene" is from 1777.

Related entries & more 
inspect (v.)

1620s, from Latin inspectus, past participle of inspicere "look at, observe, view; look into, inspect, examine," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + specere "to look" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Related: Inspected; inspecting.

Related entries & more 
penumbra (n.)

1660s, "partially shaded region around the shadow of an opaque body, a partial shadow," from Modern Latin penumbra "partial shadow outside the complete shadow of an eclipse," coined 1604 by Kepler from Latin pæne "nearly, almost, practically," which is of uncertain origin, + umbra "shadow" (see umbrage). Figurative use is by 1801. Related: Penumbral.

All points within the penumbra are excluded from the view of some part of the luminous body, and are thus partially shaded; while all points within the umbra, or total shadow, are completely excluded from view of the luminous body. [Century Dictionary]
Related entries & more 
practically (adv.)

1620s, "in a practical manner, from a practical point of view," from practical + -ly (2). Meaning "for practical purposes, as good as, in effect, so far as results and relations are concerned," is from 1748; loosened sense of "almost" is from 1869.

Related entries & more 
ken (n.1)

1550s, "cognizance, intellectual view;" 1580s in a physical sense, "range of sight;" from ken (v.), in the second sense perhaps via kenning (n.2) in the same sense in nautical use; both from PIE root *gno- "to know."

Related entries & more 

Page 6