Etymology
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coarse (adj.)

early 15c., cors "ordinary" (modern spelling is from late 16c.), probably adjectival use of noun cours (see course (n.)). Originally referring to rough cloth for ordinary wear, the sense of "rude, vulgar, unpolished" developed by c. 1500 and that of "obscene" by 1711.

Perhaps via the notion of "in regular or natural order," hence "common, vulgar" (compare the development of mean (adj.), also ornery from ordinary). Or it might be via the clothing sense, and the notion of "wanting fineness of texture or elegance of form." Or both, and there might be also an influence, via metathesis, of French gros (see gross (adj.)), which underwent a similar sense development. Related: Coarsely; coarseness.

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shimmy (v.)
"do a suggestive dance," 1918, perhaps via phrase shake the shimmy, which is possibly from shimmy (n.), a U.S. dialectal form of chemise (mistaken as a plural; compare shammy) first recorded 1837. Or perhaps the verb is related to shimmer (v.) via a notion of glistening light. Transferred sense of "vibration of a motor vehicle" is from 1925. Related: Shimmied; shimmying. As a noun, the name of a popular, fast, suggestive pre-flapper dance, by 1919.
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idealization (n.)

"act of forming in idea or in thought; act of making ideal," 1796; see idealize + noun ending -ation. Perhaps via French idéalisation.

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gravigrade (adj.)

"walking with heavy steps," 1839, probably via French, a modern scientific compound from Latin gravis "heavy" (from PIE root *gwere- (1) "heavy") + gradi "to walk" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go").

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macro- 

word-forming element meaning "long, abnormally large, on a large scale," taken into English via French and Medieval Latin from Greek makros "long, large," from PIE root *mak- "long, thin."

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commodore (n.)

"commanding naval officer," 1690s, probably via Dutch kommandeur from French commandeur, from Old French comandeor (see commander). The U.S. Navy rank was created 1862, above a captain, below a rear-admiral.

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affiliate (n.)
1846, from affiliate (v.) via the adjective. Compare associate (n.). Affiliated society in reference to a local society connected with another or associated with a central organization is from 1795.
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nosology (n.)

"study of diseases, systematic classification of diseases," 1721, from Modern Latin nosologia (perhaps via French nosologie); see noso- "disease" + -logy "study of." Related: Nosological; nosologist.

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Clothilde 
fem. proper name, via French, from German Klothilde, literally "famous in battle," from Old High German *klod "famous" (related to Old English hlud; see loud (adj.)) + hild "battle" (see Hilda).
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pseudepigraphy (n.)

"ascription of false authorship to a book," 1842, probably via German or French, from Modern Latin pseudepigrapha (see pseudepigrapha). Related: Pseudepigraphic (1830); pseudepigraphical (1838); pseudepigraphal (1630s).

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