Etymology
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meteorology (n.)

"science of the earth's atmosphere, scientific study of weather and climate," especially with a view to forecasting the weather, 1610s, from French météorologie and directly from Greek meteōrologia "treatise on celestial phenomena," literally "discussion of high things," from meteōron "thing high up" (see meteor) + -logia "treatment of" (see -logy).

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detoxification (n.)

1905, of substances, "action of depriving of poisonous qualities;" 1971, "removal of addictive substances from the body," originally in reference to habitual heavy drinkers of alcohol; see detoxify + noun ending -ation. As a type of alternative health treatment, by 1997.

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methadone (n.)

synthetic analgesic used as a substitute for morphine or heroin in treatment of addiction, 1947, generic designation for 6-dimethylamino-4, 4-diphenyl-3-heptanone. For origins of the syllables, see methyl + amino- + di- + -one.

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cure (n.1)

c. 1300, "care, heed," from Latin cura "care, concern, trouble," with many figurative extensions over time such as "study; administration; office of a parish priest; a mistress," and also "means of healing, successful remedial treatment of a disease" (late 14c.), from Old Latin coira-, a noun of unknown origin. Meaning "medical care" is late 14c.

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pragmatism (n.)

1825, "matter-of-fact treatment," from Greek pragmat-, stem of pragma "that which has been done" (see pragmatic) + -ism. As a philosophical doctrine, by 1898, said to be from 1870s; probably from German Pragmatismus. As a name for a political theory, from 1951. Related: Pragmatist (1630s as "busybody;" 1892 as "adherent of a pragmatic philosophy").

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medication (n.)

early 15c., medicacioun, "medical treatment of a disease or wound," from Old French médication and directly from Latin medicationem (nominative medicatio) "healing, cure," noun of action from past-participle stem of medicare, medicari "to medicate, heal, cure" (poetic and Late Latin) from medicus "physician; healing" (from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures"). Meaning "a medicinal substance or product" is by 1942.

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indignity (n.)
"unworthy treatment; act intended to lower the dignity of another," 1580s, from Latin indignitatem (nominative indignitas) "unworthiness, meanness, baseness," also "unworthy conduct, an outrage," noun of quality from indignus "unworthy," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + dignus "worth (n.), worthy, proper, fitting," from PIE *dek-no-, suffixed form of root *dek- "to take, accept." Related: Indignities.
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Novatian (n.)

mid-15c., member of an early Christian sect founded mid-3c. by the theologian Novatianus (c. 200-258). The schism involved readmission of Christians who had denied their faith under the Decian persecution (Novatianus favored strict treatment and non-forgiveness). Related: Novatianism.

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equiparation (n.)
mid-15c., "impartial treatment;" 1610s, "equal ranking;" from Latin aequiparationem (nominative aequiparatio) "an equalizing, comparison," from past participle stem of aequiparare "put on equality, compare," from aequipar "equal, alike," from aequus "equal, even" (see equal (adj.)) + par (see par (n.)). Related: Equiparate.
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metapolitics (n.)

1784, "abstract political science; purely speculative treatment of politics, unrelated to practical matters;" see meta- "transcending, overarching, dealing with the most fundamental matters of" + politics. Based on metaphysics. Related: Metapolitical, which is attested from 1670s in the sense of "outside the realm of politics."

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