Etymology
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tag (v.2)
"a touch in the game of tag," 1878; in baseball, 1904, from tag (n.2); the adjective in the pro-wrestling sense is recorded from 1955. Related: Tagged; tagging.
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contamination (n.)

early 15c., contaminacioun, "infection," from Medieval Latin contaminationem (nominative contaminatio) "a polluting, contamination, defilement," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin contaminare "to defile, to corrupt, to deteriorate by mingling," originally "to bring into contact," from contamen "contact; pollution," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + base of tangere "to touch" (from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle"). Figurative sense is from c. 1620; specifically of radioactivity from 1913.

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chock-a-block (adj.)

"jammed together," 1840, nautical, said of two blocks of tackle run so closely they touch; from chock + block (n.1) in the nautical sense "a pulley together with its framework."

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handle (v.)
Middle English hondlen, handlen, "touch with the hands, hold in the hands, fondle, pet," also "to deal with, treat, manhandle," from Old English handlian "to touch or move with the hands," also "deal with, discuss;" formed from hand (n.), perhaps with a frequentative suffix, as fondle from fond. Cognate with Old Norse höndla "to seize, capture," Danish handle "to trade, deal," Old High German hantalon "feel, touch; manage," German handeln "to bargain, trade." Related: Handled; handling. Meaning "to act towards" (someone, in a certain manner, usually with hostility or roughness) is from c. 1200. The commercial sense "to trade or deal in" was weaker in English than in some other Germanic languages, but it strengthened in American English (by 1888) from the notion of something passing through one's hands, and see handler.
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tongue (v.)
"to touch with the tongue, lick," 1680s, from tongue (n.). Earlier as a verb it meant "drive out by order or reproach" (late 14c.). Related: Tongued; tonguing.
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demulcent (adj.)

"soothing, allaying irritation;" as a noun, "a medicine which assuages the effects of irritation," 1732, from Latin demulcentem (nominative demulcens), present participle of demulcere "to stroke down, soothingly pet," from de "down" (see de-) + mulcere "to stroke, caress," from PIE *m(o)lk-eie- "to touch repeatedly," source also of Sanskrit mrsase "to touch." De Vaan writes that connection with *meig-, the root of mulgere "to milk," "is possible, but unproven." The obsolete verb demulce "soothe, soften, mollify" is attested from 1520s.

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tax (v.)
c. 1300, "impose a tax on," from Old French taxer "impose a tax" (13c.) and directly from Latin taxare "evaluate, estimate, assess, handle," also "censure, charge," probably a frequentative form of tangere "to touch," from PIE root *tag- "to touch, handle." Sense of "to burden, put a strain on" first recorded early 14c.; that of "censure, reprove" is from 1560s. Its use in Luke ii for Greek apographein "to enter on a list, enroll" is due to Tyndale. Related: Taxed; taxing.
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contact (v.)

1834, "to bring together or put in contact," from contact (n.). Meaning "get in touch with" is 1927, American English. Related: Contacted; contacting.

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palp (n.)

"feeler, tactile organ," 1836, from French palpe, German palp, from Latin palpus "feeler," related to palpare "to touch softly, feel," which is of uncertain origin (see palpable).

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tit for tat 
1550s, possibly an alteration of tip for tap "blow for blow," from tip (v.3) "tap" + tap "touch lightly." Perhaps influenced by tit (n.2).
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