Etymology
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bandanna (n.)

also often bandana, 1752, from Hindi bandhnu, a method of dyeing, from Sanskrit badhnati "binds" (because the cloth is tied in different places like modern tie-dye), from PIE root *bhendh- "to bind." Perhaps to English via Portuguese. The colors and spots are what makes it a bandanna.

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septum (n.)

"wall separating two cavities," especially "the partition between the nostrils," 1690s, Modern Latin, from Latin saeptum "a fence, enclosure, partition," from neuter past participle of saepire "to hedge in," from saepes"a hedge, a fence," which de Vaan suggests is from a PIE *seh-i- "to tie." Related: Septal.

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fret (n.2)

"ridge on the fingerboard of a guitar," c. 1500, of unknown origin, possibly from another sense of Old French frete "ring, ferule." Compare Middle English fret "a tie or lace" (early 14c.), freten (v.) "to bind, fasten" (mid-14c.).

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connect (v.)

mid-15c., "to join, bind, or fasten together," from Latin conectere "join together," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + nectere "to bind, tie" (from PIE root *ned- "to bind, tie").

Displaced 16c. by connex (1540s), from French connexer, from Latin *connexare, a supposed frequentative of conectere (past participle stem connex-). Connect was re-established from 1670s.

A similar change took place in French, where connexer was superseded by connecter. Meaning "to establish a relationship" (with) is from 1881. Slang meaning "get in touch with" is attested by 1926, from telephone connections. Meaning "awaken meaningful emotions, establish rapport" is from 1942. Of a hit or blow, "to reach the target," from c. 1920. Related: Connected; connecting; connectedness.

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ligation (n.)

"a tying or binding, as with a ligature," 1590s, from French ligation, from Late Latin ligationem (nominative ligatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of ligare "to bind" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). Liaison is the same word in French form.

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node (n.)

early 15c., "a knot or lump," from Latin nodus "knot" (from PIE root *ned- "to bind, tie"). Originally borrowed c. 1400 in Latin form, meaning "lump in the flesh." Meaning "point of intersection" (originally in astronomy, of planetary orbits with the ecliptic) is recorded from 1660s.

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colligate (v.)

"to bind or fasten together," 1540s, from Latin colligatus, past participle of colligare "to bind together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + ligare "to bind" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). As a concept in logic, from 1837; in linguistics, from 1953. Related: Colligation.

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noose (n.)

"loop formed by fastening a running knot or slip-knot," mid-15c., perhaps from Old French nos or cognate Old Provençal nous "knot," from Latin nodus "knot" (from PIE root *ned- "to bind, tie"). Rare before c. 1600.

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cadge (v.)

"to beg" (1812), "to get by begging" (1848), of uncertain origin, perhaps a back-formation from cadger "itinerant dealer with a pack-horse" (mid-15c.), which is perhaps from Middle English cadge "to fasten, to tie" (late 14c.), which probably is from a Scandinavian source (compare Old Norse kögur-barn "swaddled child").

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queue (v.)

"to stand in or join a line" (intransitive), by 1924, from queue (n.). Transitive sense of "arrange in or cause to form a line" is by 1928. Earlier "tie or fasten the hair in a braided pigtail" (1777). Related: Queued; queueing. Churchill is said to have coined Queuetopia (1950), to describe Britain under Labour or Socialist rule.

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