Etymology
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trimeter (n.)
"a verse of three metrical feet," 1560s, from Latin trimetrus, from Greek trimetros "having three measures," from tri- "three" (see tri-) + metron "a measure" (from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure"). Related: Trimetrical.
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TNT 
1915, abbreviation of trinitrotoluene (1908), from trinitro- indicating three nitro- groups in place of three hydrogen atoms in a compound, + toluene.
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gleek (n.)
old three-person card game, 1530s, from French glic, ghelicque (15c.), perhaps from Middle Dutch ghelic (Dutch gelijk) "like, alike" because one of the goals of the game is collecting three cards of the same rank.
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tricolor (n.)
also tricolour, 1798, "flag having three colors," especially the emblem of France adopted during the Revolution, from French tricolore, in drapeau tricolore "three-colored flag." The arrangement of colors on the modern French national flag dates from 1794.
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Clotho 

one of the three Fates, from Latin Clotho, from Greek Klōthō, literally "the spinner," from klōthein "to spin," which Beekes considers to be pre-Greek. The three Fates together sometimes were called Klōthes "the spinners."

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Triassic (adj.)
1841, from German, coined 1841 by German geologist Friedrich August von Alberti (1795-1878), from Trias "period preceding the Jurassic," from Greek trias "triad, the number three" (see triad). So called because it is divisible (in Germany) into three groups.
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worthy (adj.)
mid-13c., "having merit," from worth (n.) + -y (2). Old English had weorþful in this sense. Attested from late 14c. as a noun meaning "person of merit" (especially in Nine Worthies, famous men of history and legend: Joshua, David, Judas Maccabæus, Hector, Alexander, Julius Cæsar, Arthur, Charlemagne, Godfrey of Bouillon -- three Jews, three gentiles, three Christians). Related: Worthily; worthiness.
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Shadrach 
name of one of the three children delivered from the "fiery furnace" in Daniel iii.26.
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sheet (n.2)

"rope that controls a sail," late 13c., shortened from Old English sceatline "sheet-line," from sceata "lower part of sail," originally "piece of cloth," from same root as sheet (n.1). Compare Old Norse skaut, Dutch schoot, German Schote "rope fastened to a sail."

This probably is the notion in phrase three sheets to the wind "drunk and disorganized," first recorded 1812 (in form three sheets in the wind), an image of a sloop-rigged sailboat whose three sheets have slipped through the blocks are lost to the wind, thus "out of control." Apparently there was an early 19c. informal drunkenness scale in use among sailors and involving one, two, and three sheets, three signifying the highest degree of inebriation; there is a two sheets in the wind from 1813.

It must not be wondered at that the poor, untutored, savage Kentuckyan got "more than two thirds drunk," that is, as the sailors term it, three sheets in the wind and the fourth shivering, before the dinner was ended. [Niles' Weekly Register, May 2, 1812]
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triplicate (v.)
"to multiply by three," 1620s, from Latin triplicatus (see triplicate (adj.)). Related: Triplicated; triplicating; triplication.
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