Etymology
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overlap (v.)

"to lap or fold over, to partially extend over, extend so as to rest or lie upon," 1726; see over- + lap (v.2). Verbal phrase lap over "extend beyond" is recorded from 1630s. Related: Overlapped; overlapping.

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overexcite (v.)

also over-excite, "excite unduly or excessively," 1708 (implied in over-excited), from over- + excite. Related: Overexciting.

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overindulgence (n.)

also over-indulgence, "excessive indulgence," 1630s, from over- + indulgence. First attested in Donne (over-indulgency). Related: Overindulgent.

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ignore (v.)
1610s, "not to know, to be ignorant of," from French ignorer "be unaware of" (14c.), or directly from Latin ignorare "not to know, be unacquainted; take no notice of, disregard" (see ignorant). The original sense in English is obsolete. Sense of "pass over without notice, pay no attention to" in English first recorded 1801 (Barnhart says "probably a dictionary word"), and OED indicates it was uncommon before c. 1850. Related: Ignored; ignoring.
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nim (v.)

"to take, take up in the hands in order to move, carry, or use; take unlawfully, steal" (archaic), Old English niman "to take, accept, receive, grasp, catch," from Proto-Germanic *nemanan (source also of Old Saxon niman, Old Frisian nima, Middle Dutch nemen, German nehmen, Gothic niman), perhaps from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take." The native word, replaced by Scandinavian-derived take (v.) and out of use from c. 1500 except in slang sense of "to steal," which endured into 19c. The derivatives numb and nimble remain in use.

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sumptuous (adj.)

late 15c., from Old French sumptueux or directly from Latin sumptuosus "costly, very expensive; lavish, wasteful," from sumptus, past participle of sumere "to borrow, buy, spend, eat, drink, consume, employ, take, take up," contraction of *sub-emere, from sub "under" (see sub-) + emere "to take, buy" (from PIE root *em- "to take, distribute"). Related: Sumptuously; sumptuousness.

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overconfident (adj.)

also over-confident, "confident to excess," 1610s, from over- + confident. Related: Overconfidently.

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misapprehend (v.)

"misunderstand, take in a wrong sense," 1640s, from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + apprehend "take hold of, grasp" physically or mentally. Related: Misapprehended; misapprehending.

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conceive (v.)
Origin and meaning of conceive

late 13c., conceiven, "take (seed) into the womb, become pregnant," from stem of Old French conceveir (Modern French concevoir), from Latin concipere (past participle conceptus) "to take in and hold; become pregnant" (source also of Spanish concebir, Portuguese concebre, Italian concepere), from con-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see con-), + combining form of capere "to take" (from PIE root *kap- "to grasp").

Meaning "take into the mind, form a correct notion of" is from mid-14c., that of "form as a general notion in the mind" is from late 14c., figurative senses also found in the Old French and Latin words. Related: Conceived; conceiving.

Nearly all the senses found in Fr. and Eng. were already developed in L., where the primary notion was app. 'to take effectively, take to oneself, take in and hold'. [OED]
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overpopulate (v.)

also over-populate, "to overrun with too many people," 1828 (implied in overpopulated), from over- + populate (v.). Related: Overpopulating. Overpopulous "over-populated" is attested from 1670s.

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