Etymology
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sundown (n.)

also sun-down, 1610s, from sun (n.) + down (adv.). OED suggests perhaps a shortening of sun-go-down (1590s). Compare sunset.

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degression (n.)

"a stepping down, descent" (obsolete), late 15c., from Latin degressionem (nominative degressio) "a going down," noun of action from past-participle stem of degredi "to go down, march down, descend," from de- "down" (see de-) + gradi "to walk, go, step" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go").

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subsume (v.)

1530s, from Modern Latin subsumere "to take under," from Latin sub "under" (see sub-) + sumere "to take, obtain, buy," from sus‑, variant of sub‑ "up from under" + emere "to take" (from PIE root *em- "to take, distribute"). Related: Subsumed; subsuming, subsumption.

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washdown (n.)

also wash-down, 1949, from verbal phrase, from wash (v.) + down (adv.).

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survey (v.)

c. 1400, "to consider, contemplate," from Anglo-French surveier, Old French sorveoir "look (down) at, look upon, notice; guard, watch," from Medieval Latin supervidere "oversee, inspect," from Latin super "over" (see super-) + videre "to see" (from PIE root *weid- "to see"). Meaning "examine the condition of" is from mid-15c. That of "to take linear measurements of a tract of ground" is recorded from 1540s. Related: Surveyed; surveying; surveyance (late 14c.).

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supprise (n.)

mid-15c., "injury, wrong, outrage," from supprise (v.) "overpower, subdue, put down; grieve, afflict" (c. 1400), also "take unawares, attack unexpectedly" (mid-15c.), from Anglo-French supprise, fem. past participle of supprendre, variant of sorprendre (see surprise (n.)). The noun later also had sense "oppression; surprise attack," but perhaps originally was an alternate form of surprise used in a specific sense.

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demit (v.)

early 15c., demitten, "to run or flow down," also figurative, "to humble oneself," from Old French demetre "to send, put, or let down," and directly from Latin demittere "to send down," from de "down" (see de-) + mittere "to release, let go; send, throw" (see mission).

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takeaway (adj.)

also take-away, 1964 in reference to food-shops, from take (v.) + away. From 1970 as a noun.

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lie (v.2)

"rest horizontally, be in a recumbent position," Middle English lien, from Old English licgan (class V strong verb; past tense læg, past participle legen) "be situated, have a specific position; remain; be at rest, lie down," from Proto-Germanic *legjan (source also of Old Norse liggja, Old Saxon liggian, Old Frisian lidzia, Middle Dutch ligghen, Dutch liggen, Old High German ligen, German liegen, Gothic ligan "to lie"), from PIE root *legh- "to lie down, lay."

Especially "to lie in bed," hence often with sexual implications, as in lie with "have sexual intercourse" (c. 1300), and compare Old English licgan mid "cohabit with." To lie in "be brought to childbed" is from mid-15c. To lie to at sea is to come to a standstill. To take (something) lying down "receive passively, receive with abject submission" is from 1854.

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katabatic (adj.)

of winds, "blowing down a slope," 1904, from Greek katabatos "descending," from katabainein "to go down," a compound of kata "down" (see cata-) + bainein "to go, walk, step," from PIE root *gwa- "to go, come."

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