Etymology
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Dulcinea 

"sweetheart," 1748, from the name of Don Quixote's mistress in Cervantes' romance, the name is a Spanish fem. derivative of Latin dulce "sweet" (see dulcet).

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fragrance (n.)
1660s, from French fragrance or directly from Late Latin fragrantia, from stem of Latin fragrans "sweet-smelling" (see fragrant). Related: Fragrancy (1570s).
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redolence (n.)

early 15c., "sweet scent, fragrance," also figurative, from Old French redolence, redolens, which is related to redolent "emitting an odor" (see redolent) or from Medieval Latin redolentia.

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sugar-plum (n.)
c. 1600, figurative, "something sweet or agreeable;" see sugar (n.) + plum (n.). As a type of small, round, flavored candy, from 1660s.
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aromatize (v.)
"to perfume, render aromatic" (of medicines, the breath), early 15c., from Latin aromatizare, from Greek aromatizein "to spice," from aromat-, stem of aroma "seasoning, sweet spice," which is of unknown origin.
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*melit- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "honey."

It forms all or part of: caramel; marmalade; Melissa; mellifluous; mildew; molasses; mousse.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek meli, Latin mel "honey; sweetness;" Albanian mjal' "honey;" Old Irish mil "honey," Irish milis "sweet;" Old English mildeaw "nectar," milisc "honeyed, sweet;" Old High German milsken "to sweeten;" Gothic miliþ "honey."

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graceful (adj.)
mid-15c., "full of (divine) grace," also "pleasant, sweet," from grace (n.) + -ful. Meaning "with pleasing or attractive qualities" is from 1580s. Related: Gracefully; gracefulness.
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tokay (n.)
1710, rich sweet wine from the region of Tokay (Hungarian Tokaj) a town in Hungary. The name is perhaps Slavic, from tok "current," or Hungarian, from a Turkic personal name.
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ratafia (n.)

sweet liqueur flavored with kernels of cherries, apricots, etc., 1690s, from French ratafia (17c.), a word of unknown origin; perhaps ultimately from the same source as arrack.

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muscatel (n.)

"strong, sweet wine made from muscat grapes," 1530s, variant of muskadell (c. 1400), from Medieval Latin muscatellum, diminutive of muscat "(grape) with the fragrance of musk" (see muscat).

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