Etymology
Advertisement
tagline (n.)
"punchline of a joke," 1926, originally "last line in an actor's speech" (1916), from tag (n.1) + line (n.).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
logograph (n.)
"instrument for giving a graphic representation of speech, word-writer," 1879, from logo- "word" + -graph "instrument for recording; something written." Earliest use (1797) is in the sense "logogriph," and it frequently was used in place of that word (see logogriph). In ancient Greek, logographos was "prose-writer, chronicler, speech-writer." Related: Logographic.
Related entries & more 
aforesaid (adj.)
"mentioned before in a preceding part of the same writing or speech," a common legal word, late 14c., from afore + said.
Related entries & more 
e'en 

variant spelling of even (adj.), now archaic or poetic. E'enamost "even almost" is recorded from 1735 in Kentish speech.

Related entries & more 
paralanguage (n.)

"non-phonemic vocal factors in speech" (tone of voice, tempo, etc.), 1958, from para- (1) + language. Related: Paralinguistic.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
naughty (adj.)

late 14c., nowghty, noughti "needy, having nothing," also "evil, immoral, corrupt, unclean," from nought, naught "evil, an evil act; nothingness; a trifle; insignificant person; the number zero" (from Old English nawiht "nothing;" see naught)) + -y (2).

Specific meaning "sexually promiscuous" is from 1869. The mitigated sense of "disobedient, bad in conduct or speech, improper, mischievous" (especially of the delinquencies of children) is attested from 1630s. Related: Naughtily; naughtiness. In 16c.-18c. a woman of bad character might be called a naughty pack (also sometimes used of men and later of children).

Related entries & more 
Australian (n.)
1690s, originally in reference to aboriginal inhabitants, from Australia + -an. As an adjective by 1814. Australianism in speech is attested from 1891.
Related entries & more 
drivel (n.)

early 14c., drevel "saliva, slaver," from drivel (v.). Meaning "senseless twaddle, idiotic speech or writing" is by 1852.

Related entries & more 
firewater (n.)
also fire-water, "alcoholic liquor," 1826, American English, supposedly from speech of American Indians, from fire (n.) + water (n.1).
Related entries & more 
aitch (n.)
"the letter H," representing the pronunciation of the letter-name, by 1887, originally especially in reference to dropping it in colloquial speech.
Related entries & more 

Page 6