Etymology
Advertisement
nightclub (n.)
also night-club, "club open at night," 1894, from night + club (n.) in the social sense.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
clubbable (adj.)

"having qualities that make one fit to be a member of a social club," 1783, from club (n.) + -able.

Related entries & more 
maladjustment (n.)

"faulty adjustment, lack of adjustment," 1823, from mal- + adjustment. In a psychological sense, "unsuccessful adaptation to one's social environment," by 1899.

Related entries & more 
homophile (n.)
1960, from homo- (2) "homosexual" + -phile. An attempt to coin a word for a homosexual person as part of a social group, rather than a sexual deviant.
Related entries & more 
patrilocal (adj.)

1906, in reference to the customs of certain social groups where a married couple settles in the husband's house or community, from patri- + local (adj.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
roleplay (n.)

also role-play, "act or condition of behaving as another would behave in a certain situation," 1958, from the verbal phrase, "to act out the role of" (by 1949); see role (n.) + play (v.). Related: Role-playing

Related entries & more 
gesellschaft (n.)
1887, "social relationship based on duty to society or an organization," from German Gesellschaft, from geselle "companion" + -schaft "-ship."
Related entries & more 
functionalism (n.)
1892, "functionality;" 1902 as a term in social sciences; from functional + -ism. In architecture from 1930. Related: functionalist.
Related entries & more 
proxemics (n.)

"the study of social distancing in a cultural context," 1963, from proximity + emic (also see -ics). Apparently coined by U.S. anthropologist Edward T. Hall.

Related entries & more 
declasse (adj.)

"having lost one's place in the social order," 1887, from French déclassé, past participle of déclasser "to cause to lose class," from de-, privative prefix (see de-) + classer "to class," from classe (n.), from Latin classis  (see class (n.)). In italics in English until c. 1920; nativized form declassed is attested from 1873.

Fallen or put out of one's proper class or place or any definite and recognized position or rank in the social system: applied to persons who by misfortune or their own fault have lost social or business standing, and are not counted as part of any recognize class of society. [Century Dictionary, 1897]
Related entries & more 

Page 6