Etymology
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leadership (n.)
1821, "position of a leader, command," from leader + -ship. Sense extended by late 19c. to "characteristics necessary to be a leader, capacity to lead."
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authorship (n.)
c. 1500, "the function of being a writer," from author (n.) + -ship. Meaning "literary origination, source of something that has an author" is attested by 1808.
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longship (n.)
also long-ship, Old English langscip "warship, man-of-war;" see long (adj.) + ship (n.). Translating Latin navis longa.
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membership (n.)

1640s, "state of being a member," from member + -ship. Meaning "number of members, members of a body regarded collectively" is by 1850.

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penmanship (n.)

"the use of the pen in writing; manner of writing, handwriting," 1690s, from obsolete penman in the sense of "one who writes a good hand" + -ship.

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airship (n.)
also air-ship, 1819, from air (n.1) + ship (n.). From 1888 as a translation of German Luftschiff "motor-driver dirigible."
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receivership (n.)

late 15c., "office of a receiver of public revenues," from receiver + -ship. As "condition of being under control of a receiver," 1884.

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clerkship (n.)

late 15c., "state of being in holy orders," from clerk (n.) + -ship. From 1540s as "function or business of an office clerk."

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showmanship (n.)

"the skills and arts of one who presents shows to public audiences for admission," 1859, from showman "one who presents shows" + -ship.

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stewardship (n.)
"position or responsibilities of a steward," mid-15c., from steward (n.) + -ship. Specific ecclesiastical sense of "responsible use of resources in the service of God" is from 1899.
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