Etymology
Advertisement
peppery (adj.)

1690s, "of or pertaining to pepper," from pepper (n.) + -y (2). Figurative sense of "irritable, passionate, sharp" is from 1826. Related: Pepperiness.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
nippy (adj.)

"biting, sharp," 1898, colloquial, in reference to a "biting" chill in the air, from nip (n.2) + -y (2). Related: Nippiness.

Related entries & more 
sharpie (n.)

1860, "a type of long, flat-bottomed sailboat, American English, from sharp (adj.) + -ie. Meaning "slicker, clever person" is by 1942 (see sharper).

Related entries & more 
clangor (n.)

"a sharp, metallic, ringing sound," 1590s, from Latin clangor "sound of trumpets (Virgil), birds (Ovid), etc.," from clangere "to clang," echoic (compare clang).

Related entries & more 
acrylic (adj.)

1843, "of or containing acryl," the name of a radical derived from acrolein (1843), the name of a liquid in onions and garlic that makes eyes tear, from Latin acer "sharp" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce") + olere "to smell" (see odor) + -in (see -ine (2)). With adjectival suffix -ic. Modern senses often short for acrylic fiber, acrylic resin, etc.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
knowing (adj.)

"with knowledge of truth," late 14c., present-participle adjective from know (v.). From c. 1500 as "shrewd, sharp, smart." Related: Knowingly.

Related entries & more 
lancet (n.)

"small, sharp surgical instrument," late 14c., launcet, from Old French lancette "small lance" (12c.), diminutive of lance (see lance (n.)).

Related entries & more 
yelp (n.)

Old English gielp "boasting, pride, arrogance," from source of yelp (v.). Meaning "quick, sharp bark or cry" is attested from early 16c.

Related entries & more 
butcher-knife (n.)

"large, sharp, heavy knife used for cutting and trimming meat," 1822, from butcher (n.) + knife (n.). Butcher's knife is attested from 1714.

Related entries & more 
screech (n.)

"sharp, shrill cry," 1550s, from screech (v.). Earlier scritch (1510s). In reference to a harsh, squeaking noise made by something, by 1882.

Related entries & more 

Page 6