Etymology
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satchel (n.)

"small sack or bag," mid-14c., sachel, from Old French sacel, sachel and directly from Late Latin saccellus, saccellum "money bag, purse," diminutive of Latin sacculus, itself a diminutive of saccus "bag" (see sack (n.1)).

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satirical (adj.)

"of, pertaining to, or containing satire," 1520s, from satiric or from Late Latin satiricus, from Latin satira "satire, poetic medley" (see satire (n.)). With -al (1). Related: Satirically.

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satiation (n.)

"act of satiating, a being or becoming satiated," 1630s, noun of action from satiate (v.).

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sated (adj.)

"glutted, satiated," 1690s, past-participle adjective from sate (v.).

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satrap (n.)

late 14c., in translations of the Old Testament, "the governor of a province of ancient Persia," from Latin satrapes, from Greek satrapēs, exatrapēs, from Old Persian xšathrapavan-, literally "guardian of the realm," from xšathra- "realm, province" (related to xšayathiya "king," cognate with Sanskrit kshatra; see shah) + pavan- "guardian" (from PIE root *pa- "to feed; to guard, protect").

Extended by late 14c. to any autocratic superior, and figuratively to a despotic official under a tyrant, a sense, according to OED, also found in Medieval Latin and all the Romanic languages. Related: Satrapy (n.); satrapess (n.); satrapal; satrapial; satrapian.

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sativa 

in scientific plant name classifications from late 18c., indicating a cultivated form, is from Latin sativus "cultivated, that is sown or planted," from satus, past participle of serere "to sow, plant seed" (from PIE root *sē- 

"to sow"). Sative (adj.) formerly was used in English for "sown, as in a garden (1590s). E.g. Cannabis sativa, originally the plant cultivated in the West, distinguished from indica, a wild species growing in and around India. 

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satisfied (adj.)

1816, of persons, "gratified, contented," past-participle adjective from satisfy. Earlier was self-satisfied (1734).

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satin (n.)

"smooth, lustrous silken cloth; silk fabric with a very glossy surface and the back less so," mid-14c., from Old French satin (14c.), perhaps from Arabic (atlas) zaytuni, literally "(satin) from Zaitun," name of a place in China, perhaps modern Quanzhou in Fukien province, a major port in the Middle Ages with a resident community of European traders.

On this theory the form of the word was influenced in French by Latin seta "silk." OED finds the Arabic connection etymologically untenable and takes the French word as being from Latin seta via a Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *pannus setinus "silken cloth."

As an adjective from mid-15c., "made of silk." By c. 1600 as "clothed in satin;" by 1826 as "resembling satin."

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satisfactory (adj.)

mid-15c., satisfactorie, "expiatory, capable of atoning for sin," from Old French satisfactoire (14c.) and directly from Medieval Latin satisfactorius, from Latin satisfactus, past participle of satisfacere "discharge fully, comply with, make amends," literally "do enough" (see satisfy).

The meaning "adequate, fulfilling the demands or requirements of the case" is from 1630s; that of "that fully gratifies or contents, that justifies a feeling of satisfaction" is from 1660s. Related: Satisfactorily; satisfactoriness. Bentham used satisfactive for "having to do with reparation" (1829).

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satirize (v.)

c. 1600, "to write satires," an intransitive sense, now obsolete, from French satiriser, from the noun in French (see satire (n.)). The transitive sense of "assail with satire, expose (someone or something) to censure or ridicule with satiric wit" is by 1630s. As Related: Satirized; satirizing.

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