Etymology
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easeful (adj.)

"attended by or affording ease; promoting rest or comfort; quiet, peaceful, restful," late 14c., from ease (n.) + -ful.

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lier (n.)

"one who reclines; one who is laid to rest," 1590s, agent noun from lie (v.2). Lier-by "kept mistress" is from 1580s.

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lull (n.)

1650s as the name of a soothing drink, from lull (v.). Meaning "temporary period of quiet or rest amid turmoil or activity" is from 1815.

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electromagnetism (n.)

also electro-magnetism, "the collective term for phenomena which rest upon the relation between electric currents and magnetism," 1821; see electro- + magnetism.

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hermit (n.)

early 12c., "religious recluse, one who dwells apart in a solitary place for religious meditation," from Old French hermit, ermit "hermit, recluse," from Late Latin eremita, from Greek eremites, literally "person of the desert," from eremia "a solitude, an uninhabited region, a waste," from erēmos "uninhabited, empty, desolate, bereft," from PIE *erem- "to rest, be quiet" (source also of Sanskrit ramate "to rest;" Lithuanian rimti "to be quiet," Gothic rimis "rest," Old Irish fo-rimim "to set, lay"). The unetymological h- first appeared in Medieval Latin heremite.

Transferred sense of "person living in solitude" is from 1799. Related: Hermitic; hermitical. The hermit crab (1735) is said to be so called for its seeking out and dwelling in a solitary cell.

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posada (n.)

"inn," 1763, from Spanish posada "home, lodging," from posar "to repose, rest, lodge," from Medieval Latin pausare "to halt, cease, pause; to lodge," from pausa (see pause (n.)).

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anticyclone (n.)

"outward rotary flow of air from an area of atmospheric high pressure," 1863, coined by Francis Galton, English polymath, explorer, and meteorologist, from anti- + cyclone. Related: Anticyclonic.

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sept (n.)

"enclosed area," 1540s, from Latin septum (see septum). As "division of a nation or tribe," 1510s, it is apparently a different word, "prob. a var. of sect" [OED].

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bedtime (n.)

also bed-time, "the usual hour of going to rest," early 13c., from bed (n.) + time (n.). Bed-time story is attested from 1867.

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stagecoach (n.)

also stage-coach, 1650s, from stage (n.) in a sense of "division of a journey without stopping for rest" (c. 1600) + coach (n.).

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