Etymology
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Taoism (n.)

religious system founded by Lao Tzu (b. 604 B.C.E.), 1838, from Chinese tao "way, path, right way (of life), reason" + -ism.

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talisman (n.)

1630s, "magical figure cut or engraved under certain observances," from French talisman, in part via Arabic tilsam (plural tilsaman), from Byzantine Greek telesma "talisman, religious rite, payment," earlier "consecration, ceremony," originally in ancient Greek "completion," from telein "perform (religious rites), pay (tax), fulfill," from telos "end, fulfillment, completion" (see telos). The Arabic word also was borrowed into Turkish, Persian, Hindi. Related: Talismanic; talismanical.

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Manichaean 

also Manichean, 1550s (n.) "an adherent of the religious system taught by Manichaeus;" 1630s (adj.) "of or pertaining to the Manichaeans or their doctrines;" from Latin Manichaeus (see Manichaeism).

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ruly (adj.)

c. 1400, reuleli, "conforming to (religious) rule; amenable to rule, disciplined, orderly," from rule (n.) + -ly (2). Modern use (19c. and after) probably is usually a back-formation.

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Protestantism (n.)

"state of being a Protestant; religious principles of Protestants," 1640s, from French protestantisme or else formed from Protestant + -ism. Meaning "Protestant Christians or churches" is from 1660s.

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minister (v.)
Origin and meaning of minister

early 14c., ministren, "to perform religious rites, provide religious services;" mid-14c., "to serve (food or drink);" late 14c. "render service, aid, or medicine; furnish means of relief or remedy" from Old French menistrer "to serve, be of service, administer, attend, wait on," and directly from Latin ministrare "to serve, attend, wait upon," from minister "inferior, servant, priest's assistant" (see minister (n.)). Related: Ministered; ministering.

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solemn (adj.)

mid-14c., "performed with due religious ceremony or reverence, sacred, devoted to religious observances," also, of a vow, etc., "made under religious sanction, binding," from Old French solempne (12c., Modern French solennel) and directly from Latin sollemnis "annual, established, religiously fixed, formal, ceremonial, traditional," perhaps related to sollus "whole" (from PIE root *sol- "whole, well-kept").

"The explanation that Latin sollemnis was formed from sollus whole + annus year is not considered valid" [Barnhart], but some assimilation via folk-etymology is possible. In Middle English also "famous, important; imposing, grand," hence Chaucer's friar, a ful solempne man. Meaning "marked by seriousness or earnestness" is from late 14c.; sense of "fitted to inspire devout reflection" is from c. 1400. Related: Solemnly.

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shivah (n.)

seven-day mourning period in Jewish religious custom, 1892, from Hebrew shibhah "seven," short for shibh'ath yeme ha'ebhel "the seven days of mourning" for the dead.

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sectary (n.)

"member or adherent of a sect," 1550s, from French sectaire or directly from Medieval Latin sectarius, from secta "religious group, sect in philosophy or religion" (see sect).

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-theism 

word-forming element meaning "belief (of a specified kind) in God, a god, or gods," from Greek theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + -ism.

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