Etymology
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bespoke (adj.)

"custom or custom-made, made to order," of goods (as distinguished from ready-made), 1755, the same sense is found earlier in bespoken (c. 1600), past-participle adjective from bespeak in its sense of "speak for, arrange beforehand," which is attested in bespeak from 1580s. Now usually of tailored suits.

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agreeable (adj.)

late 14c., of things, "to one's liking, pleasant, satisfactory, suitable," from Old French agreable "pleasing; in agreement; consenting" (12c., Modern French agréable), from agreer "to satisfy; to take pleasure in" (see agree). Of persons, "willing or ready to consent," mid-15c. Related: Agreeably; agreeability; agreeableness. To do the agreeable (1825) was to "act in a courteous manner."

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credulity (n.)

early 15c., "faith, belief," from Old French credulité (12c.), from Latin credulitatem (nominative credulitas) "easiness of belief, rash confidence," noun of quality from credulus "that easily believes, trustful," from credere "to believe" (see credo). Meaning "a weak or ignorant disregard of the importance of evidence, a disposition too ready to believe," especially absurd or impossible things, is from 1540s.

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ripe (adj.)

Old English ripe, of grain, fruit, seed, a field, "ready for reaping, mature," of animals used as food, "fit for eating," from West Germanic *ripijaz (source also of Old Saxon ripi, Middle Dutch ripe, Dutch rijp, Old High German rifi, German reif); related to Old English repan "to reap" (see reap).

Usually explained as "fit for reaping," in which case it would have been originally of grains and extended to all fruit. Figurative use by c. 1200. As "full-grown, developed, finished" (a ripe age) by late 14c. The meaning "ready for some action or effect" (as in the time is ripe) is from late 14c. Of lips, the mouth, "round and full, like ripe fruit," by 1580s. Related: Ripely. The proverb soon ripe, soon rotten is attested by 1540s.

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minuteman (n.)

also minute-man, in U.S. history, one of a class of militia who held themselves in readiness for immediate service in arms (i.e. ready "at a minute's notice" or "in a matter of minutes"), 1774, from minute (n.) + man (n.). As the name of a type of ICBM, from 1961, so called because they could be launched with very little preparation.

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communicable (adj.)

late 14c., "communicating," from Old French communicable and directly from Late Latin communicabilis, from Latin communicare "to share, divide out; communicate, impart, inform; join, unite, participate in," literally "to make common," related to communis "common, public, general" (see common (adj.)). Meaning "capable of being imparted or transferred" is from 1530s. Sense of "ready to converse or impart information" is from 1530s. Related: Communicability.

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preparatory (adj.)

"serving to prepare the way for something to follow," early 15c., preparatori, from Late Latin praeparatorius, from Latin praeparatus, past participle of praeparare "make ready beforehand" (see prepare).

Earlier in same sense was preparative (c. 1400). The word was applied by 1822 in the United Kingdom to junior schools in which pupils are "prepared" for a higher school.

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prompt (adj.)

early 15c., "ready, prepared (to do something), quick to act as occasion demands," from Old French prompt (13c.) and directly from Latin promptus "brought forth," hence "visible, apparent, evident, at hand," past-participle adjective from promere "to take or bring out or forth" (see prompt (v.)). Meaning "given or performed without delay" is from 1520s. Related: Promptly.

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defensible (adj.)

c. 1300, "ready and able to fight, able to defend," from Old French defensable, from Medieval Latin defensibilis, Late Latin defensibilem, from Latin defens-, past-participle stem of defendere (see defend). Meaning "capable of being defended" is from late 14c., sense of "contributing to defense" is from c. 1400; that of "that may be vindicated" is from early 15c. Related: Defensibility.

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malapert (adj.)

late 14c., "impudent, shameless, presumptuous," from Old French mal apert "over-ready, impudent," literally "ill-skilled," from mal "badly" (see mal-) + apert "skillful," variant of espert "experienced, skillful, clever" (from Latin expertus; see expert (adj.)). Attested from c. 1300 as the name of the personification of impudence. From mid-15c. as an adverb, "impudently, presumptuously." Related: Malapertly; malapertness.

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