Etymology
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quadruplicate (adj.)

"fourfold, four times repeated," 1650s, from Latin quadruplicatus, past participle of quadruplicare "make fourfold," from quadri- "four" (from PIE root *kwetwer- "four") + plicare "to fold" (from PIE root *plek- "to plait").

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quadruplicate (v.)

"to make fourfold, double twice," 1660s, from Latin quadruplicatus, past participle of quadruplicare "make fourfold," from quadri- "four" (from PIE root *kwetwer- "four") + plicare "to fold" (see ply (v.1)).  The sense of "make or provide in four identical versions" is by 1879. Related: Quadruplicated; quadruplicating.

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quadruplication (n.)

"the act of making fourfold," 1570s, from Latin quadruplicationem (nominative quadruplicatio) "a making fourfold," noun of action from past-participle stem of quadruplicare "make fourfold" (see quadruplicate (v.)).

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quaere 

Latin imperative of quaerere "to ask, inquire" (see query (v.)). Used in English in the sense of "one may ask" (1530s) as an introduction to a question. Also used as a synonym of query (1580s).

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quaff (v.)

"to drink or swallow in large draughts," 1510s (implied in quaffer), a word of obscure origin, perhaps imitative, or perhaps from Low German quassen "to overindulge (in food and drink)," with -ss- misread as -ff-. Related: Quaffed; quaffer; quaffing. The noun, "act of quaffing; the amount of liquor drunk at once," is attested by 1570s, from the verb.

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quag (n.)

"marshy spot," 1580s, a variant of Middle English quabbe "a marsh, bog, shaking marshy soil," from Old English *cwabba "shake, tremble" (like something soft and flabby). Related: Quaggy.

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quagga (n.)

zebra-like South African animal, partly striped, 1785, from Afrikaans (1710), from the name for the beast in a native language, perhaps Khoisan (Hottentot) quacha, which often is said somehow to be of imitative origin. According to OED, in modern Xhosa, the form is iqwara, with a clicking -q-. What was likely the last one died in an Amsterdam zoo in 1883.

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quagmire (n.)

1570s, "soft, wet, boggy land; a marsh," from obsolete quag "bog, marsh" + mire (n.). Early spellings or related forms include quamyre (1550s), quabmire (1590s), quadmire (c. 1600), quavemire (1520s), qualmire.

The extended sense of "difficult situation, inescapable bad position" is recorded by 1766; but this seems to have been not in common use in much of 19c. (absent in "Century Dictionary," 1897, which does, however, have a verb, marked "rare," meaning "to entangle or sink in or as in a quagmire"). It revived in a narrower sense in American English in reference to stalled military actions, 1965, with reference to the U.S. war in Vietnam (popularized in the book title "The Making of a Quagmire" by David Halberstam).

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quahog (n.)

"large, edible, round clam of the Atlantic Coast of the U.S.," much used for soups and chowders, by 1753 in roughly the modern spelling (quogue; Roger Williams had it as poquauhock, 1643), from an Algonquian language, perhaps Narragansett poquauhock or Pequot p'quaghhaug "hard clam."

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quai (n.)

1870, "public path beside a waterway," usually having buildings along the land side, from French quai (12c., see quay). In a French context it is often short for Quai d'Orsay, the street on the south bank of the Seine in Paris, since mid-19c. site of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and hence sometimes used metonymically for it (by 1922).

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