Etymology
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kimono (n.)

1630s, from Japanese kimono, literally "a thing put on," from ki "wear, put on" + mono "thing."

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perspicacity (n.)

"state or character of being perspicacious; keenness of sight, clearness of understanding," 1540s, from French perspicacité (15c.) and directly from Late Latin perspicacitas "sharp-sightedness, discernment," from Latin perspicax "sharp-sighted, having the power of seeing through," from perspicere "look through, look closely at," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + specere "look at" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). An earlier word was perspicience "ability to see all things, infinite vision" (c. 1400).

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propone (v.)

"propose, put forward," c. 1400, proponen, from Latin proponere "to put forth, place before" (see propound). Related: Proponed; proponing; proponement.

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stell (v.)

"to fix in position" (obsolete or dialectal), Old English stellan "to place, put, set," from Proto-Germanic *staljanan (source also of German stellen), from *stalli-, from PIE root *stel- "to put, stand, put in order," with derivatives referring to a standing object or place.

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perennial (adj.)

1640s, of plants or leaves, "evergreen" (a sense now obsolete), formed in English from Latin perennis "lasting through the year (or years)," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + annus "year" (see annual (adj.)). The botanical sense of "remaining alive through more than two years" is attested from 1670s; of springs, etc., "lasting or continuing without cessation through a year or many years," by 1703. The figurative meaning "enduring, permanent" is from 1750. Related: Perennially. For vowel change, see biennial. The noun meaning "a perennial plant" is from 1763.

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transfix (v.)

1580s, "pierce through, impale," from French transfixer (15c.), from Latin transfixus "impaled," past participle of transfigere "to impale, pierce through," from trans "across, beyond; through" (see trans-) + figere "to fix, fasten" (from PIE root *dheigw- "to stick, fix"). Figurative sense of "make motionless or helpless, as with amazement, terror, or grief" is first recorded 1640s. Related: Transfixed; transfixing.

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diarrhea (n.)

"morbid frequent evacuation of the bowels," late 14c., diaria, from Old French diarrie, from Late Latin diarrhoea, from Greek diarrhoia "diarrhea" (coined by Hippocrates), literally "a flowing through," from diarrhein "to flow through," from dia- "through" (see dia-) + rhein "to flow" (from PIE root *sreu- "to flow"). Respelled 16c. from diarria on Latin model.

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interposition (n.)

late 14c., from Old French interposicion "interpolation, intercalation; suspension, break" (12c.), from Latin interpositionem (nominative interpositio) "an insertion," noun of action from past participle stem of interponere "to put between, place among; put forward," from inter "between" (see inter-) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)).

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Parzival 

also Parsifal, hero of medieval legends, from Old French Perceval, literally "he who breaks through the valley," from percer "to pierce, break through" (see pierce) + val "valley" (see vale).

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abscond (v.)
Origin and meaning of abscond

"depart suddenly and secretly," especially to escape debt or the law, 1560s, from French abscondre "to hide" and directly from Latin abscondere "to hide, conceal, put out of sight," from assimilated form of ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + condere "put together, store," from assimilated form of com- "together" (see com-) + -dere "put" (from PIE root *dhe- "to put, place"). Related: Absconded; absconder; absconding.

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