Etymology
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contraposition (n.)

"a placing over against, opposite position," 1550s, from Late Latin contrapositionem (nominative contrapositio), noun of action from past-participle stem of contraponere "to place opposite, to oppose to," from contra "against" (see contra (prep., adv.)) + ponere "to put, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)).

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surfeit (n.)

early 14c., "excess quantity;" late 14c., "overindulgence," from Old French sorfet "excess; arrogance" (Modern French surfait), noun use of past participle of surfaire "overdo," from sur- "over" (see sur- (1)) + faire "do," from Latin facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

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translator (n.)

mid-14c., from Old French translator (12c.) or directly from Latin translator "one who transfers or interprets, one who carries over," agent noun from transferre (see transfer (v.)).

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rank (v.)

1570s, "arrange in lines;" 1590s, "put in order, classify; assign a rank to," also "have a certain place in a hierarchy," from rank (n.). The meaning "outrank, take precedence over" is by 1841. Related: Ranked; ranking. An earlier verb ranken (mid-13c.) "to fester, suppurate" is from rank (adj.).

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stele (n.)

"upright slab," usually inscribed, 1820, from Greek stēlē "standing block, slab," especially one bearing an inscription, such as a gravestone, from PIE *stal-na-, suffixed form of root *stel- "to put, stand, put in order," with derivatives referring to a standing object or place. Related: Stelar.

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purdah (n.)

1800, in India, "a curtain serving to screen women from the sight of men or strangers," from Urdu and Persian pardah "veil, curtain," from Old Persian pari "around, over" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, against, around") + da- "to place" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

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sheathe (v.)

c. 1400, shethen, "furnish (a sword, etc.) with a sheath" (a sense now obsolete), from sheath (q.v.), or from Old English *sceaþian (implied in unsceaþian). The meaning "put (a sword, etc.) in a sheath" is attested from early 15c. The general sense of "cover over, encase" is by 1630s. Related: Sheathed; sheathing.

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reprobate (n.)

1540s, "one rejected by God, person given over to sin," from reprobate (adj.). Sense of "abandoned or unprincipled person" is from 1590s.

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traitor (n.)

c. 1200, "one who betrays a trust or duty," from Old French traitor, traitre "traitor, villain, deceiver" (11c., Modern French traître), from Latin traditor "betrayer," literally "one who delivers," agent noun from stem of tradere "deliver, hand over," from trans- "over" (see trans-) + dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). Originally usually with a suggestion of Judas Iscariot; especially of one false to his allegiance to a sovereign, government, or cause from late 15c. Compare treason, tradition.

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insuperable (adj.)

mid-14c., "unconquerable, incapable of being surmounted," from Old French insuperable (14c.) or directly from Latin insuperabilis "that cannot be passed over, unconquerable," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + superabilis "that may be overcome," from superare "to overcome," from superus "one that is above," from super "over" (from PIE root *uper "over"). Figurative use from 1650s. Related: Insuperably; insuperability.

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