Etymology
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catsuit (n.)

also cat-suit, "tight-fitting full-body garment," 1960, from cat (n.) + suit (n.). Perhaps so called because suitable for slinking.

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slim (v.)
1808, "to scamp one's work, do carelessly or superficially," from slim (adj.). Meaning "to make slim" (a garment, etc.) is from 1862; meaning "reduce (one's) weight" is from 1930. Related: Slimmed; slimming.
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pinafore (n.)

1782, "sleeveless apron worn by children," originally to protect the front of the dress, from pin (v.) + afore "on the front." So called because it was originally pinned to a dress front. Later a fashion garment for women (c. 1900).

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waterproof (adj.)
also water-proof, 1725, from water (n.1) + proof (n.). Noun meaning "garment of waterproof material" is from 1799. The verb is first recorded 1843. Related: Waterproofed; waterproofing.
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redingote (n.)

"double-breasted outer coat with long plain skirts," also a similar garment for women, 1793, from French redingote (1725), representing a French pronunciation of English riding coat (c. 1500).

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William 

masc. proper name, from Old North French Willaume, Norman form of French Guillaume, of Germanic origin (cognates: Old High German Willahelm, German Wilhelm), from willio "will" (see will (n.)) + helma "helmet," from Proto-Germanic *helmaz "protective covering" (from PIE root *kel- (1) "to cover, conceal, save;" compare helm (n.2)). After the Conquest, the most popular given name in England until supplanted by John.

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ganache (n.)

"soft, sweet paste made of melted chocolate and cream," 1962, from Italian, the thing itself is said by Ayto ["Diner's Dictionary"] to have been created in Paris c. 1850; the name is of unknown origin. It is attested 19c. as the name of a kind of garment and an insult ("blockhead").

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slash (n.)
"a cutting stroke with a weapon," 1570s, from slash (v.); sense of "slit in a garment" is from 1610s; that of "open tract in a forest" is first attested 1825, American English. As a punctuation mark in writing or printing, it is recorded from 1961.
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overcoat (n.)

"large coat worn over ordinary clothing," 1802, from over- + coat (n.). Earlier words include overcloth "an outer garment" (late 14c.); overgarment "outer coat" (late 15c.).

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night-shift (n.)

1710, "garment worn by a woman at night," from night (n. ) + shift (n.2). The meaning "gang of workers employed after dark" is attested from 1839, from shift (n.1).  

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