Etymology
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overwork (v.)

"to cause to work too hard," 1520s, from over- + work (v.). The figurative sense of "to work into a state of excitement and confusion" is by 1640s. Old English oferwyrcan meant "to work all over," i.e. "to decorate the whole surface of." Related: Overworked; overworking.

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workstation (n.)

also work-station, 1950, from work (n.) + station (n.). Computer sense is from 1972.

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homework (n.)

also home-work, 1680s, "work done at home," as opposed to work done in the shop or factory, from home (n.) + work (n.). In sense of "lessons studied at home," it is attested from 1889. To do (one's) homework in figurative sense "be prepared" is from 1934.

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workaround (n.)

also work-around, by 1987, from the verbal phrase, from work (v.) + around (adv.).

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scrollwork (n.)

"ornamental work in which scrolls or scroll-like lines figure," 1822, from scroll (n.) + work (n.).

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paperwork (n.)

1580s, "things made of paper," from paper (n.) + work (n.). Meaning "work done on paper" is from 1889.

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brushwork (n.)

also brush-work, "manner of working with a brush; work done with a brush," 1849 in reference to painting, from brush (n.1) in the painting sense + work (n.).

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opus (n.)

"a work, composition," especially a musical one, 1809, from Latin opus "a work, labor, exertion" (source of Italian opera, French oeuvre, Spanish obra), from Proto-Italic *opes- "work," from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance." The plural, seldom used as such, is opera. Opus Dei, literally "the work of God," is a Catholic organization founded in Spain in 1928 to re-establish Christian ideals in society through examples of the lives of the members.

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needlework (n.)

"sewing, embroidery, etc.; work produced by means of the needle," late 14c., from needle (n.) + work (n.).

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line-up (n.)

also lineup, from the verbal phrase line up (1889 as "form a line;" 1902 as "make into a line"); see line (v.2) + up (adv.). As a noun, the baseball version (1889) is older than the police version (1907).

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