Etymology
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allusion (n.)

1540s, "metaphor, parable" (a sense now obsolete); 1550s, "word-play, joke;" 1610s as "passing or casual reference," from Latin allusionem (nominative allusio) "a playing with, a reference to," noun of action from past-participle stem of alludere "to play, jest, make fun of," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ludere "to play" (see ludicrous). An allusion is never an outright or explicit mention of the person or thing the speaker seems to have in mind.

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underwhelm (v.)
1953 (implied in underwhelming), a facetious play on overwhelm, with under. Related: Underwhelmed; underwhelmingly.
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romp (n.)

1734, "a piece of lively play," from romp (v.). From 1706 as "a wanton, merry, rude girl," in this sense perhaps a variant of ramp (n.2) suggested by the notion of "girl who indulges in boisterous play."

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one-act (adj.)

of a play, "consisting of a single act," 1888, from one + act (n.).

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clown (v.)

c. 1600, "to play the clown onstage," from clown (n.); colloquial sense of "to behave inappropriately" (as in clown around, 1932) is attested by 1928, perhaps from the theatrical slang sense of "play a (non-comical) part farcically or comically" (1891). Related: Clowned; clowning.

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lusus naturae (n.)
in natural history, "freak of nature," 1660s, a Latin phrase, from lusus "a play," from stem of ludere "to play" (see ludicrous) + genitive of natura (see nature (n.)). Originally of fossils, before there was a scientific basis for understanding their existence.
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lake (v.)
"to play, sport," Old English lacan (see lark (n.2)).
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demagogue (v.)

"to play the demagogue," 1650s (implied in demagoguing), from demagogue (n.). Related: Demagogued.

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Ice-Capade (n.)
1941, originally a film title, from ice (n.) + a punning play on escapade.
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bop (v.)

"to hit, strike, punch," 1931, imitative. As a noun from 1934. Sense of "play bop music, play (a song) in a bop style" is from 1948, from bop (n.). It soon came to mean "do any sort of dance to pop music" (1956). Related: Bopped; bopping.

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