Etymology
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ochre (n.)

common name of a type of clayey soil much used in pigments, late 13c., oker, ocre, from Old French ocre (c. 1300) and directly from Medieval Latin ocra, from Latin ochra, from Greek khra, from khros "pale yellow," a word of unknown origin. It consists hydrated sesquioxids of iron mixed with various earthy materials, principally silica and alumina. As a color name, "brownish-yellow," it is attested from mid-15c. Related: Ochreous.

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blaze (n.1)

"bright flame, fire," Old English blæse "a torch, firebrand; bright glowing flame," from Proto-Germanic *blas- "shining, white" (source also of Old Saxon blas "white, whitish," Middle High German blas "bald," originally "white, shining," Old High German blas-ros "horse with a white spot," Middle Dutch and Dutch bles, German Blesse "white spot," blass "pale, whitish"), from PIE root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn."

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serum (n.)

1670s, "watery animal fluid," especially the clear pale-yellow liquid which separates in coagulation of blood in wounds, etc., from Latin serum "watery fluid, whey." This is held to be from PIE *sero- "flowing, liquid," from verbal root *ser- "to run, flow" (source also of Greek oros "whey, watery parts of curdled milk;" Sanskrit sarah "flowing, liquid," sarit "brook, river"). The word was applied by 1893 to blood serum used in medical treatments.

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light (adj.2)

"not dark," Old English leoht (West Saxon), leht (Anglian), "luminous, bright, beautiful, shining; having much light," from Proto-Germanic *leuhta- (source also of Old Saxon and Old High German lioht, Old Frisian liacht, German licht "bright"), from the source of Old English leoht (see light (n.)). Meaning "pale-hued" is from 1540s; prefixed to other color adjectives from early 15c. In earlier Middle English in reference to colors it meant "bright, vivid" (early 14c.).

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albino (n.)

"a person of pale, milky complexion, with light hair and pink eyes," also used of an animal characterized by the same condition or a plant with white leaves or flowers, 1777, from Spanish or Portuguese albino, from Latin albus "white" (see alb). Used by Portuguese of white-spotted African negroes. Extended 1859 to animals having the same peculiarity. As an adjective form albinotic is modeled on hypnotic and other words from Greek; albinistic also is used. A female form, if one is still wanted, was albiness (1808).

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choleric (adj.)

mid-14c., colrik, "bilious of temperament or complexion," from Old French colerique, from Late Latin cholericus, from Greek kholerikos, from Greek kholera "a type of disease characterized by diarrhea, supposedly caused by bile," from khole "gall, bile," so called for its color, related to khloazein "to be green," khlōros "pale green, greenish-yellow," from PIE root *ghel- (2) "to shine," with derivatives denoting "green, yellow," and thus "bile, gall." Meaning "easily angered, hot-tempered" is from 1580s (from the supposed effect of excess choler); that of "pertaining to cholera" is from 1834.

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paleontology (n.)

also palaeontology, "the science of the former life of the Earth, as preserved in fossils," 1833, probably from French paléontologie, from Greek palaios "old, ancient" (see paleo-) + ontologie "science or study of being and the essence of things" (see ontology). Related: Paleontological.

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Palestine 

from Latin Palestina (name of a Roman province), from Greek Palaistinē (Herodotus), from Hebrew Pelesheth "Philistia, land of the Philistines" (see Philistine). In Josephus, the country of the Philistines; extended under Roman rule to all Judea and later to Samaria and Galilee.

Revived as an official political territorial name 1920 with the British mandate. Under Turkish rule, Palestine was part of three administrative regions: the Vilayet of Beirut, the Independent Sanjak of Jerusalem, and the Vilayet of Damascus. In 1917 the country was conquered by British forces who held it under occupation until the mandate was established April 25, 1920, by the Supreme Council of the Allied Powers at San Remo. During the occupation Palestine formed "Occupied Enemy Territory Administration (South)," with headquarters at Jerusalem.

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paleobotany (n.)

"study of extinct or fossil plants," 1872, from paleo- + botany.

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Paleocene (adj.)

in reference to the geological epoch preceding the Eocene, 1874, from French paléocène, coined 1874 by French paleobotanist Wilhelm Philippe Schimper from paleo- + Latinized form of Greek kainos "new" (see recent), on model of earlier Miocene, Eocene, etc. It is, thus, the "old new" age.

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