Etymology
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osier (n.)

species of willow with tough, flexible branches used in basket-work, c. 1300, "a willow switch," from 14c. of the tree itself, from Old French osier, ozier "willow twig" (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin osera, osiera "willow," ausaria "willow bed," a word of unknown origin, perhaps from Gaulish. Old English had the word as oser, from Medieval Latin.

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Osmanli 

1792, "an Ottoman Turk," especially a member of the ruling dynasty; as an adjective by 1829, "relating to the empire of Turkey," from Turkish Osmanli "of or pertaining to Osman," founder of the Ottoman dynasty (he reigned 1259-1326); his name is the Turkish pronunciation of Arabic Uthman. This is the native word where English generally uses Ottoman. In early use as a noun in English often mistakenly regarded as a plural.

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osmium (n.)

metallic element of the platinum group, 1803, coined in Modern Latin by its discoverer, English chemist Smithson Tennant (1761-1815) from Greek osmē "smell, scent, odor" good or bad, from PIE root *hed- "to smell" (see odor). With metallic element ending -ium. So called for the pungent smell of its oxide, a highly poisonous acid. The densest stable element, it commonly is found in alloy with iridium. Related: Osmic; osmious.

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ostensible (adj.)

1730, "capable of being shown, that can be shown or seen, presentable," from French ostensible, from Latin ostens-, past-participle stem of ostendere "to show, expose to view; to stretch out, spread before; exhibit, display," from assimilated form of ob "in front of" (see ob-) + tendere "to stretch" (from PIE root *ten- "to stretch"). Meaning "apparent, professed, put forth or held out as real" is from 1771.

Ostensible is, literally, that may be or is held out as true, real, actual, or intended, but may or may not be so: thus, a person's ostensible motive for some action is the motive that appears to the observer, and is held out to him as the real motive, which it may or may not be. [Century Dictionary, 1895]
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ostentation (n.)

mid-15c., ostentacioun, "ambitious display, pretentious show, display intended to evoke admiration or attract attention," from Old French ostentacion (mid-14c.) and directly from Latin ostentationem (nominative ostentatio) "showing, exhibition, vain display," noun of action from past-participle stem of ostentare "to display," frequentative of ostendere "to show" (see ostensible).

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ostomy (n.)

"surgical operation making a permanent opening in the body," 1957, abstracted from colostomy, etc.; ultimately from Modern Latin stoma "opening, orifice," from Greek stoma "mouth" (see stoma).

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osteopath (n.)

"one who practices osteopathy," by 1897, a back-formation from osteopathy.

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osculation (n.)

"a kissing; a kiss," 1650s, from Latin osculationem (nominative osculatio) "a kissing," noun of action from past-participle stem of osculari "to kiss" (see osculate).

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Osco- 

combining form of Oscan (q.v.).

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-osis 

word-forming element expressing state or condition, in medical terminology denoting "a state of disease," from Latin -osis and directly from Greek -osis, formed from the aorist of verbs ending in -o. It corresponds to Latin -atio.

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