Etymology
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vue 

French, literally "view, sight; aspect, appearance; vision" (see view (n.)).

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audiovisual (adj.)

also audio-visual, "pertaining to or involving both sound and sight," 1937, from audio- + visual.

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stare (n.1)

late 14c., "power of sight," from stare (v.). From c. 1700 as "a fixed gaze."

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optic (adj.)

late 14c., optik, "of or pertaining to the eye as the organ of vision," from Old French optique, obtique (c. 1300) and directly from Medieval Latin opticus "of sight or seeing," from Greek optikos "of or having to do with sight," from optos "seen, visible," related to ōps "eye," from PIE root *okw- "to see." Meaning "relating to or pertaining to vision or sight" is from 1590s. Optics "eyes" is from 1640s; "formerly the learned and elegant term; afterwards pedantic, and now usually humorous" [OED].

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lucubrate (v.)

1620s, "to work at night," from Latin lucubratus, past participle of lucubrare "work at night, work by lamplight," from the stem of lucere "to shine" (from PIE *louk-eyo-, suffixed (iterative) form of root *leuk- "light, brightness"). Hence "to write or study laboriously" (1804).

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lurker (n.)

"one who keeps out of sight," early 14c., agent noun from lurk (v.). In the internet sense by 1990.

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spectacles (n.)

"glass lenses to help a person's sight," early 15c., from plural of spectacle. Earlier in singular form (late 14c.).

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spectacular (adj.)

1680s, from Latin spectaculum "a sight, show" (see spectacle) + -ar. As a noun, attested by 1890. Related: Spectacularly.

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self-effacing (adj.)

"keeping out of sight or in the background," 1836, from self- + effacing (see efface). Self-effacement is recorded from 1838.

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noctivagant (adj.)

"rambling or wandering in the night," 1620s, from Latin noct-, stem of nox "night" (see noct-) + vagantem (nominative vagans), present participle of vagari "to wander, stroll about, roam, be unsettled, spread abroad," from vagus "roving, wandering" (see vague). Related: Noctivagation; noctivagous.

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