Etymology
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polymorphous (adj.)

"having or exhibiting many or various forms," 1785, from Greek polymorphos "multiform, of many forms, manifold," from polys "many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + morphē "shape, form," a word of uncertain etymology. Especially of insects: "undergoing a series of marked changes during development." Related: Polymorphic; polymorphously; polymorphousness.

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ornate (adj.)

"ornamented, artistically finished, decorated; decorous," c. 1400, from Latin ornatus "fitted out, furnished, supplied; adorned, decorated, embellished," past participle of ornare "adorn, fit out," from stem of ordo "row, rank, series, arrangement" (see order (n.)). Earliest reference is to literary style. Related: Ornately; ornateness.

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concatenate (v.)

"to link together, unite in a series or chain, " 1590s, from Late Latin concatenatus, past participle of concatenare "to link together," from com "with, together" (see con-) + catenare, from catena "a chain" (see chain (n.)). Related: Concatenated; concatenating. As an adjective, concatenate "linked together" is attested from 1540s.

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rosary (n.)

mid-15c., rosarie, "rose garden, ground set apart for the cultivation of roses," a sense now obsolete, from Latin rosarium "rose garden," in Medieval Latin also "garland; string of beads; series of prayers," from noun use of neuter of rosarius "of roses," from rosa "rose" (see rose (n.1)).

The sense of "series of prayers" is attested by 1540s, from French rosaire, a figurative use of the French word meaning "rose garden," on the notion of a "garden" of prayers. In high medieval times, collections often were compared to bouquets (compare anthology and Medieval Latin hortulus animae "prayerbook," literally "little garden of the soul"). The meaning was transferred by 1590s to the strings of beads carried on the person and used as a memory aid in reciting the rosary.

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coil (n.)

1620s, "length of rope or cable," a specialized nautical sense from coil (v.). General sense "ring or series of rings in which a pliant body is wound" is from 1660s; hence, such a form forced onto a non-pliant body (1826). Specific sense "electrical conductor wound in a coil" is from 1849. Related: Coils.

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concatenation (n.)

c. 1600, "state of being linked together," from Late Latin concatenationem (nominative concatenatio) "a linking together," noun of action from past participle stem of concatenare "to link together," from com "with, together" (see con-) + catenare, from catena "a chain" (see chain (n.)). As "a series of things united like links in a chain" from 1726.

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self-destruct (v.)

in reference to things, "destroy itself automatically;" see self- + destruct, apparently first attested in the U.S. television series "Mission Impossible" (1966). Self-destructive "having the property of annulling itself" is recorded from 1650s, and self-destruction "destruction of oneself, suicide" is attested from 1580s; self-destroying (n.) is from 1610s.

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syllabus (n.)
1650s, "table of contents of a series of lectures, etc.," from Late Latin syllabus "list," ultimately a misreading of Greek sittybos "parchment label, table of contents," of unknown origin. The misprint appeared in a 15c. edition of Cicero's "Ad Atticum" (see OED). Had it been a real word, the proper plural would be syllabi.
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sitcom (n.)

by 1959, from the first elements of situation comedy, a phrase attested from 1953 of television shows, 1943 of radio programs; see situation.

Even Bing Crosby has succumbed to series TV and will appear in a sitcom as an electrical engineer who happens to break into song once a week. [Life magazine, Sept. 18, 1964]
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brainiac (n.)
"very smart person," 1982, U.S. slang, from brain (n.) + ending from ENIAC, etc. Brainiac also was the name of a comic book villain in the Superman series and a do-it-yourself computer building kit, both from the late 1950s, and the word may bear traces of either or both of these.
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