Etymology
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dink (n.2)

derogatory for "Vietnamese," 1969, U.S. military slang, of uncertain origin.

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generalissimo (n.)

"supreme military commander," 1620s, from Italian generalissimo, superlative of generale, from a sense development similar to French general (see general (n.)). Parson Weems applied it to George Washington. In 20c. use sometimes from Spanish generalísimo in reference to the military dictator Franco.

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draftee (n.)

"person conscripted for military purpose," 1864, American English, from draft + -ee.

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ack-ack 
1939, representing A.A., the military abbreviation for anti-aircraft (see ack).
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M.A.S.H. 
1950, U.S. military acronym for Mobile Army Surgical Hospital.
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fubar (adj.)
by 1944, acronym from fucked up beyond all recognition. Said to be military slang originally.
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M.P. 

1917, abbreviation of military police, which is recorded from 1827. By 1809 as an abbreviation of Member of Parliament.

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decamp (v.)

1670s, "to break camp, depart from a place of encampment" (military), from French décamper (17c.), earlier descamper, from des- (see dis-) + camper (see camp (n.)). Non-military sense of "go away promptly or suddenly" is by 1751. Related: Decamped; decamping.

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goose-step (n.)
1806, originally a military drill to teach balance; "to stand on each leg alternately and swing the other back and forth." This, presumably, reminded someone of a goose's way of walking. In reference to "marching without bending the knees" (as in Nazi military reviews) it apparently is first recorded 1916. As a verb by 1854.
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recon 

military slang shortening; 1918 for reconnaissance (n.); 1966 for reconnoiter (v.).

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