Etymology
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middlebrow 

1911 (adj.) "having average or moderate cultural interest;" 1912 (n.) "person of average or moderate cultural interests," from middle (adj.) + brow (compare highbrow, lowbrow).

[T]here is an alarmingly wide chasm, I might almost say a vacuum, between the high-brow, who considers reading either as a trade or as a form of intellectual wrestling, and the low-brow, who is merely seeking for gross thrills. It is to be hoped that culture will soon be democratized through some less conventional system of education, giving rise to a new type that might be called the middle-brow, who will consider books as a source of intellectual enjoyment. ["The Nation," Jan, 25, 1912]
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Middlesex 

literally "(land of the) Middle Saxons" (those between Essex and Wessex); originally a much larger region. See middle (adj.) + Saxon.

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Middle Earth (n.)

"the earth regarded as placed midway between heaven and hell or the abode of the gods and the underworld," late 13c., from middle (adj.) + earth. Altered from earlier middel-erd (late 12c.), midden-erd, itself an alteration (by association with Middle English eard "dwelling") of Old English middangeard (see Midgard).

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praiseworthy (adj.)

mid-15c., preise-worthi, "deserving of praise," from praise (v.) + worthy. Usually hyphenated until mid-19c. An earlier word was preisable (mid-14c.). Related: Praiseworthiness.

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horribly (adv.)

mid-14c., from horrible + -ly (2). Colloquial sense of "exceedingly, intolerably" is from mid-15c.

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hangman (n.)

public executioner, mid-14c. (mid-13c. as a surname), from hang (v.) + man (n.). As the name of a spelling game, by 1951. Hangestere "female executioner" is found mid-15c.

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blundering (adj.)

mid-14c., present-participle adjective from blunder (v.). Related: Blunderingly. As a verbal noun, mid-15c.

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friseur (n.)

"hairdresser," mid-18c, from French friseur, from friser "to curl, frizz" (see frizz (v.)). Archaic from mid-19c.

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untaught (adj.)

mid-14c., "not instructed or educated," from un- (1) "not" + taught. Hence "spontaneous, natural" (mid-15c.).

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weather-vane (n.)

also weathervane, mid-15c., wederfane; see weather (n.) + vane. Weathercock also is mid-15c. (wedurkoke).

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