Etymology
Advertisement
Caroline 
fem. proper name, from French, from Italian Carolina, originally a fem. adjective from Medieval Latin Carolus "Charles" (see Charles).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
summate (v.)
"to add, combine," 1900, from Medieval Latin summatus, past participle of summare "to sum" (see summation). Related: Summated; summating.
Related entries & more 
lunation (n.)
"time from one new moon to the next," late 14c., from Medieval Latin lunationem, from Latin luna "moon" (see luna).
Related entries & more 
farrier (n.)

1560s, "one who shoes horses," from French ferrier "blacksmith," from Latin ferrarius "blacksmith," noun use of adjective meaning "of iron," from ferrum "iron" (in Medieval Latin, also "horseshoe"); see ferro-. An earlier form of it in English was ferrer, ferrour "ironsmith" (late 12c. as a surname), from Old French ferreor, from Medieval Latin ferrator "blacksmith."

Related entries & more 
deduce (v.)

early 15c., deducen, "to show, prove, demonstrate;" late 15c., "to deduct," from Latin deducere "lead down, derive" (in Medieval Latin, "infer logically"), from de "down" (see de-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). The usual modern sense of "draw a conclusion from something already known" is first recorded 1520s, from Medieval Latin. Related: Deduced; deducing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
officiate (v.)

"to perform the duty of a priest," 1630s, from Medieval Latin officiatus, present participle of officiare "perform religious services," from Latin officium "a service" (in Medieval Latin, "church service"); see office. The earlier verb in English was simply office (mid-15c.). Related: Officiated; officiating.

Related entries & more 
Boise 
city in Idaho, U.S., from French-Canadian boisé, literally "wooded," from French bois "wood," which (with Italian bosco, Spanish bosque, Medieval Latin boscus) apparently is borrowed from the Germanic root of bush (n.). Medieval Latin boscus was used especially of "woodland pasture."
Related entries & more 
incorrigibility (n.)

"incapability of correction or amendment," late 15c., incorrigibilite, from Medieval Latin incorrigibilitas; see incorrigible + -ity.

Related entries & more 
afflux (n.)
"a flowing toward," 1610s, from Medieval Latin affluxus, noun use of past participle of affluere (see affluent).
Related entries & more 
Holy Land 
"western Palestine, Judaea," late 13c., translating Medieval Latin terra sancta (11c.).
Related entries & more 

Page 6