Etymology
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detergent (n.)

"detergent substance," 1670s, from detergent (adj.). Originally a medical term; application to "chemical cleansing product" is by 1932.

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histo- 
medical word-forming element, from Greek histos "warp, web," literally "anything set upright," from histasthai "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Taken by 19c. medical writers as the best Greek root from which to form terminology for "tissue, structural element of the animal body."
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elytro- 
word-forming element used for "vagina" in medical terms, from Greek elytron, literally "sheath" (see elytra). Related: Elytral.
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vena cava (n.)
Medical Latin, from Latin vena "vein" (see vein) + cava, from cavus "hollow" (from PIE root *keue- "to swell," also "vault, hole").
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infarct (n.)
substance of an infarction, 1873, from medical Latin infarctus (variant of infartus), past participle of infarcire "to stuff into" (see infarction).
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laryngitis (n.)
"inflammation of the larynx," 1818, Medical Latin, from combining form of larynx (q.v.) + -itis "inflammation." Related: Laryngitic (1847).
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medevac 

"military helicopter for taking wounded soldiers to a hospital," 1966, U.S. military, formed from elements of medical evacuation.

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tarsal (adj.)
"of or pertaining to the ankle or instep," 1817, from tarsus (n.) + -al (1), or from medical Latin tarsalis.
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CAT 
1975, medical acronym for computerized axial tomography or something like it. Related: CAT scan.
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anuria (n.)
"absence of urination," 1838, medical Latin, from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + ouron "urine" (see urine) + abstract noun ending -ia.
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