Etymology
Advertisement
Polydorus 

Priam's youngest son (Homer), from Latin Polydorus, from Greek Polydoros "one who has received many gifts," noun use of adjective meaning "richly endowed," from polys "much, many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + dōron "gift" (from PIE root *do- "to give").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
multi-ply (adj.)

"having several layers or webs," 1887, from multi- "many" + ply (n.) "a layer, a fold."

Related entries & more 
polyandry (n.)

"state of having more husbands than one at the same time," 1767, nativized form of polyandria, from Greek but taken in senses not found in Greek: "having many husbands," or, in botany, "having many stamens." The Greek word meant "populousness." Related: Polyandrist.

Related entries & more 
often (adv.)

"repeatedly, again and again, many times, under many circumstances," mid-13c., an extended form of oft, in Middle English typically before vowels and h-, probably by influence of its opposite, seldom (Middle English selden). In common use from 16c., replacing oft. Related: Oftener; oftenest.

Related entries & more 
centipede (n.)

"venomous, many-legged, insect-sized arthropod," 1640s (earlier in English in Latin form, c. 1600), from French centipède, from Latin centipeda "many-footed arthropod," from centum "hundred" (see hundred) + pedis, genitive of pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). Related: Centipedal.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
polygeny (n.)

1864, in anthropology, "the doctrine that the human race is not one but consists of many distinct species" (opposed to monogeny or monogenism), from Late Greek polygenēs "of many kinds," from polys "many" (see poly-) + -genēs "born" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget"). By c. 1970 the same word was used in a different sense, in reference to the theory that multiple genes contribute to the form or variant of some particular trait of an organism. Another word for the anthropological theory was polygenism (1857).

Related entries & more 
Franglais (n.)
"French marred by many English and American words," 1964, from French (1959), from français "French" + anglais "English."
Related entries & more 
multiprocessor (n.)

also multi-processor, "computer system with more than one processor," 1961, from multi- "many" + processor.

Related entries & more 
polygenetic (adj.)

"formed by several different causes or in several different ways," 1873, from poly- "many" + genetic.

Related entries & more 
multinational (adj.)

also multi-national, by 1921, "comprising or pertaining to many nations," from multi- + national. Originally with reference to states; later (by 1960) to corporations and organizations. As a noun, short for multinational corporation (itself attested by 1956), one having branches, offices, etc. in many countries, it is attested by 1971.

Related entries & more 

Page 6