Etymology
Advertisement
hoplite (n.)
"heavy-armed foot soldier of ancient Greece," 1727, from Greek hoplites "heavy-armed," as a noun, "heavy-armed soldier, man-at-arms," from hopla "arms and armor, gear for war," plural of hoplon "tool, weapon, implement." One who carries a large shield, as opposed to a peltastes, so called for his small, light shield (pelte).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
polemicist (n.)
Origin and meaning of polemicist

"one given to controversy," 1859, an American English formation parallel to polemist (1825), from Greek polemistēs "a warrior," from polemizein "to wage war, to make war," from polemos "war," a word of unknown origin.

Related entries & more 
warrior (n.)
c. 1300, from Old North French werreier (Old French guerroieor) "a warrior, soldier, combatant, one who wages war," from werreier "wage war," from werre (see war (n.)).
Related entries & more 
belligerent (adj.)
1570s, "waging war, engaged in hostilities," from Latin belligerantem (nominative belligerans), past participle of belligerare "to wage war," from bellum "war" (see bellicose) + gerere "to bear, to carry" (see gest). The noun meaning "party or nation at war" is from 1811. Related: Belligerently.
Related entries & more 
POW (n.)
also P.O.W., initialism (acronym) for prisoner of war, coined 1919 but not common until World War II.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
warhorse (n.)
also war-horse, 1650s, "powerful horse ridden into war," from war (n.) + horse (n.). Figurative sense of "seasoned veteran" of anything is attested from 1837. In reference to women perceived as tough, by 1921.
Related entries & more 
polemology (n.)

"the study of war," 1870, from Greek polemos "war," a word of unknown origin, + connective -o- + -logy.

Related entries & more 
virtuous (adj.)
c. 1300, "characterized by vigor or strength; having qualities befitting a knight; valiant, hardy, courageous;" from Old French vertuos "righteous; potent; of good quality; mighty, valiant, brave" (12c.), from Late Latin virtuosus "good, virtuous," from Latin virtus "moral strength, high character, goodness; manliness; valor, bravery, courage (in war); excellence, worth," from vir "man" (from PIE root *wi-ro- "man").

From mid-14c. in English as "having beneficial or efficacious properties;" late 14c. (of persons) as "having excellent moral qualities; conforming to religious law." Related: Virtuously; virtuousness.
Related entries & more 
polemicize (v.)

"engage in controversial argument, carry on a controversy," 1953, from polemic + -ize. Related: Polemicized; polemicizing. Earlier was polemize (1828), from Greek polemizein "to make war, to wage war," from polemos "war," a word of unknown origin.

Related entries & more 
warhead (n.)
also war-head, 1898, "explosive part of a torpedo," from war (n.) + head (n.). Later transferred to any missile (1944).
Related entries & more 

Page 6