Etymology
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workstation (n.)
also work-station, 1950, from work (n.) + station (n.). Computer sense is from 1972.
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teamwork (n.)
also team-work, 1828 in the literal sense, "work done by a team of horses, oxen, etc." (as distinguished from manual labor), from team (n.) + work (n.). Attested by 1909 in the extended sense.
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journalist (n.)
1690s, "one whose work is to write or edit public journals or newspapers," from French journaliste (see journal (n.) + -ist). Journalier also occasionally has been used. Meaning "one who keeps a journal" is from 1712. Related: Journalistic. The verb journalize (1680s) usually is restricted to "make entry of in a journal or book."
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homework (n.)
also home-work, 1680s, "work done at home," as opposed to work done in the shop or factory, from home (n.) + work (n.). In sense of "lessons studied at home," it is attested from 1889. To do (one's) homework in figurative sense "be prepared" is from 1934.
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brushwork (n.)

also brush-work, 1849 in reference to painting, from brush (n.1) in the painting sense + work (n.).

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masterpiece (n.)

"a work or performance of a master, a piece of work of surpassing excellence," c. 1600, from master (n.) + piece (n.1). A loan-translation of Dutch meesterstuk "work by which a craftsman attains the rank of master" (or its German cognate Meisterstück).

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synergy (n.)
1650s, "cooperation," from Modern Latin synergia, from Greek synergia "joint work, a working together, cooperation; assistance, help," from synergos "working together," related to synergein "work together, help another in work," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + ergon "work" (from PIE root *werg- "to do"). Meaning "combined activities of a group" is from 1847; sense of "advanced effectiveness as a result of cooperation" is from 1957.
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lucubrate (v.)

1620s, "to work at night," from Latin lucubratus, past participle of lucubrare "work at night, work by lamplight," from the stem of lucere "to shine" (from PIE *louk-eyo-, suffixed (iterative) form of root *leuk- "light, brightness"). Hence "to write or study laboriously" (1804).

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needlework (n.)

"sewing, embroidery, etc.; work produced by means of the needle," late 14c., from needle (n.) + work (n.).

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millwork (n.)

also mill-work, "machinery used in mills or manufacturies," 1770, from mill (n.1) + work (n.).

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