Etymology
Advertisement
purr (v.)

"uttering a low, murmuring sound expressive of satisfaction or pleasure, as a cat," 1610s, of imitative origin. Related: Purred; purring. As a noun, "sound made by a purring cat,"  from c. 1600. A similar imitative word, curr "make a low murmuring sound, purr" (1670s), was used of doves and cats.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
dejected (adj.)

"depressed at heart, low-spirited," 1580s, past-participle adjective from deject. Related: Dejectedly; dejectedness.

Related entries & more 
nibble (v.)

"to bite gently; eat by gnawing off small bits," c. 1500, not found in Middle English; perhaps from Low German nibbeln "to nibble, gnaw," related to Middle Low German nibbelen, Middle Dutch knibbelen "to gnaw," source of Dutch knibbelen "to cavail, squabble." Related: Nibbled; nibbling.

Related entries & more 
toot (v.)

c. 1500, of horns, ultimately imitative, also found in Middle Low German and Low German tuten "blow a horn." Related: Tooted; tooting. Tooting as a strong affirmative (as in you're damned tootin') is attested from 1932, American English. Reduplicated form rootin' tootin' "noisy, rambunctious" is recorded by 1924.

Related entries & more 
clank (v.)

1610s, "cause to make a sharp, hard, metallic sound," perhaps echoic, perhaps a blend of clang (v.) and clink (v.), perhaps from a Low German source (compare Middle Dutch clank, Dutch klank, Old High German klanc, Middle Low German klank, German Klang). Intransitive sense "give out a clank" is from 1650s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
dock (n.1)

"ship's berth, any structure in or upon which a ship may be held for loading, repairing, etc.," late 15c., dokke, from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German docke, which is perhaps ultimately (via Late Latin *ductia "aqueduct") from Latin ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"); or possibly from a Scandinavian word for "low ground" (compare Norwegian dokk "hollow, low ground"). The original sense was perhaps "furrow a grounded vessel makes in a mud bank."

Related entries & more 
cloddish (adj.)

"of the nature of a clod," hence "base, low, boorish," 1838, from clod (n.) + -ish. Related: Clodishly; clodishness.

Related entries & more 
Swede (n.)

"native of Sweden," 1610s, from Low German, from Middle Low German Swede, from a source akin to Old English Sweoðeod, literally "Swede-people," from Sweon (plural) "Swedes" (Old Norse, Old Swedish Sviar), called by the Romans Suiones, probably from Proto-Germanic *sweba "free, independent," or else from *geswion "kinsman."

Related entries & more 
intertidal (adj.)

also inter-tidal, "between the high and low water marks," 1853, from inter- + tidal (adj.).

Related entries & more 
cay (n.)

"low island of sand or coral," 1707, from Spanish cayo; see key (n.2).

Related entries & more 

Page 6