Etymology
Advertisement
glance (v.)
mid-15c., of weapons, "strike obliquely without giving full impact," a nasalized form of glacen "to graze, strike a glancing blow" (c. 1300), from Old French glacier "to slip, make slippery" (compare Old French glaciere "part of a knight's armor meant to deflect blows"), from glace "ice" (see glacial). Sense of "look quickly" (first recorded 1580s) probably was by influence of Middle English glenten "look askance" (see glint (v.)), which also could account for the -n-. Related: Glanced; glancing.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
*spek- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to observe."

It forms all or part of: aspect; auspex; auspices; auspicious; bishop; circumspect; conspicuous; despicable; despise; episcopal; especial; espionage; espy; expect; frontispiece; gyroscope; haruspex; horoscope; inspect; inspection; inspector; introspect; introspection; perspective; perspicacious; perspicacity; prospect; prospective; respect; respite; retrospect; scope; -scope; scopophilia; -scopy; skeptic; species; specimen; specious; spectacle; spectacular; spectrum; speculate; speculation; speculum; spice; spy; suspect; suspicion; suspicious; telescope.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit spasati "sees;" Avestan spasyeiti "spies;" Greek skopein "behold, look, consider," skeptesthai "to look at," skopos "watcher, one who watches;" Latin specere "to look at;" Old High German spehhon "to spy," German spähen "to spy."
Related entries & more 
speculum (n.)
1590s, in surgery and medicine, "instrument for rendering a part accessible to observation," from Latin speculum "reflector, looking-glass, mirror" (also "a copy, an imitation"), from specere "to look at, view" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). As a type of telescope attachment from 1704.
Related entries & more 
scowl (v.)

"lower the brows, as in anger or displeasure, put on a frowning look," c. 1400, scoulen, probably from a Scandinavian source (compare Norwegian skule "look furtively, squint, look embarrassed," Danish skule "to scowl, cast down the eyes"). According to Klein's sources, this is probably related to Old English sceolh "wry, oblique," Old High German scelah "curved," German scheel "squint-eyed;" from a PIE root *sqel- "crooked, curved, bent." Related: Scowled; scowling; scowlingly.

Related entries & more 
circumspect (adj.)

"cautious, wary," literally "looking about on all sides," early 15c., from Latin circumspectus "deliberate, guarded, well-considered," past participle of circumspicere "look around, take heed," from circum "around, round about" (see circum-) + specere "to look" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Related: Circumspectly; circumspectness.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
scope (n.2)

[instrument for viewing] 1872, shortened from telescope, microscope, etc., in which the element (Latinized) is from Greek skopein "to look" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Earlier used as a shortening of horoscope (c. 1600). Extended to radar screens, etc., by 1945 as a shortening of oscilloscope.

Related entries & more 
peer (v.)
"to look closely," 1590s, variant of piren (late 14c.), with a long -i-, probably related to or from East Frisian piren "to look," of uncertain origin. Influenced in form and sense by Middle English peren (late 14c.), shortened form of aperen (see appear). Related: Peered; peering.
Related entries & more 
respite (n.)

mid-13c., "extension of time for an action, deliberation, etc., grace period; postponement of an action, judgment, etc.," from Old French respit "delay, respect" (Modern French répit), from Latin respectus "consideration, recourse, regard," literally "act of looking back (or often) at one," noun use of past participle of respicere "look back at, regard, consider," from re- "back" (see re-) + specere "look at" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe").

A doublet of respect (n.). From early 14c. as "a reprieve, temporary cessation of hostilities, suffering, etc."

Related entries & more 
despicable (adj.)

"that may be or deserves to be despised," 1550s, from Late Latin despicabilis, from Latin despicari "despise, disdain," which is related to despicere "to look down upon," from de- "down" (see de-) + spicere, variant of specere "to look at" (from PIE root *spek- "to observe"). Related: Despicability; despicably; despicableness.

Related entries & more 
intuitive (adj.)

1640s, "perceiving directly and immediately," from French intuitif or directly from Medieval Latin intuitivus, from intuit-, past-participle stem of Latin intueri "look at, consider," from in- "into" (from PIE root *en "in") + tueri "to look at, watch over," a word of uncertain origin. Meaning "self-evident" is from 1833. Related: Intuitively; intuitiveness.

Related entries & more 

Page 6