Etymology
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logocentric (adj.)
"centered on reason," 1931, from logo- "reason" + -centric.
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logocracy (n.)

"system of government in which words are the ruling powers," 1804; see logo- + -cracy "rule or government by." Popularized by Washington Irving.

In this country [America] every man adopts some particular slang-whanger as the standard of his judgment, and reads everything he writes, if he reads nothing else: which is doubtless the reason why the people of this logocracy are so marvellously enlightened. [Irving, "Salmagundi," 1821]
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logomaniac (n.)

"one mad for words," 1870; see logo- "word" + maniac (see mania).

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logophobia (n.)
"fear of words," 1890; see logo- "word" + -phobia "fear." Related: Logophobe; logophobic.
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logogram (n.)
"word-sign, sign or character representing a word," 1840, from logo- "word" + -gram. Generically, "any symbol representing graphically a product, idea, etc.," from 1966. The earliest use of the word (1820) is in the sense "logograph," but OED explains this as a substitute for logograph, "which in this sense is itself a mistake for logogriph," the old type of word-puzzle.
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logogriph (n.)
type of word puzzle based on synonyms, etc., and often in the form of a verse, 1590s, from French logogriphe, from Greek logos "word" (see Logos) + gripos/griphos "riddle," a figurative use, literally "fishing basket, creel," probably from a pre-Greek word in a lost Mediterranean language. "The variation [p/ph] is typical for Pre-Greek words; such an origin for a fisherman's word is quite understandable" [Beekes].
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logopoeia (n.)

a quality in poetic writing that charges words with meaning based on context and prior usage, a term introduced, along with phanopoeia (visual image) and melopoeia (sound), by Ezra Pound from Greek logopoeia, from logos "word" (see Logos) + poiein "to make, create" (see poet).

[T]he good writer chooses his words for their 'meaning,' but that meaning is not a set, cut-off thing like the move of knight or pawn on a chess-board. It comes up with roots, with associations, with how and where the word is familiarly used, or where it has been used brilliantly or memorably.
You can hardly say 'incarnadine' without one or more of your auditors thinking of a particular line of verse. [Pound, "ABC of Reading," 1934]
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loggerhead (n.)

1580s, "stupid person, blockhead, dunce, numbskull," perhaps from dialectal logger "heavy block of wood" + head (n.). Later it meant a type of thick-headed iron tool (1680s), a type of cannon shot, a post in the stern of a whale-boat, and a type of turtle (1650s). Loggerheads "fighting, fisticuffs" is from 1670s, but the exact notion in the compound is uncertain, perhaps it suggests the heavy tool used as a weapon. The phrase at loggerheads "in disagreement" is first recorded 1670s.

[W]e three loggerheads be: a sentence frequently written under two heads, and the reader by repeating it makes himself the third. [Grose, "Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1785]
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logo (n.)
"simple symbol or graphic meant to represent something," 1937, probably a shortening of logogram "sign or character representing a word."
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loggy (adj.)
"heavy, sluggish," 1847; see logy. Related: Logginess.
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