Etymology
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unlike (adv.)

c. 1300, "unevenly," from un- (1) "not" + like (adv.) (see like (adj.)). From 1590s as "in a manner differing."

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arachnoid (adj.)

"cobweb-like," especially of the membrane around the brain and spinal cord, 1789, from Modern Latin arachnoides, from Greek arakhnoeides "cobweb-like," from arakhnē "cobweb" (see arachnid) + -oeidēs (see -oid).

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bawl (v.)

mid-15c., "to howl like a dog," from Old Norse baula "to low like a cow," and/or Medieval Latin baulare "to bark like a dog," both echoic. The meaning "shout loudly" is attested from 1590s. To bawl (someone) out "reprimand loudly" is by 1908, American English. Related: Bawled; bawling.

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Hell's Kitchen 

disreputable, impoverished New York City neighborhood, the name attested from 1879. The phrase was used from at least 1866 as an intensive form of Hell.

Hell's kitchen (American), a horrible slum. Hell's Kitchen, Murderer's Row, and the Burnt Rag are names of localities which form collectively the worst place in New York. [Albert Barrère and Charles G. Leland, "A Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant," 1889]
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hircine (adj.)

"goat-like," 1650s, from Latin hircinus "like a goat, of a goat," from hircus "he-goat, buck," which is probably related to hirsutus "shaggy, rough-haired" (see hirsute). "In general, words for 'goat' lack a PIE etymology" [de Vaan]. Latin also had hircosus "smelling like a goat," and hirquitallus "adolescent boy." English has used hircinous for "having a goat-like odor."

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scurrility (n.)

"low, vile, buffoon-like scoffing or jeering; indecent or gross abusiveness," c. 1500, from Latin scurrilitas "buffoonery," from scurrilis "buffoon-like" (see scurrilous).

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simulant (adj.)

"simulating something else," 1846, from Latin simulantem (nominative simulans), present participle of simulare "to make like, imitate, copy" from stem of similis "like, resembling" (see similar).

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ladylike (adj.)

also lady-like, 1580s, "refined, well-bred, courteous;" see lady + like (adj.). Middle English had ladily "queenly, exalted" (late 14c.).

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shot (adj.)

early 15c., of fish (implied in shotfish), "having discharged its spawn," past-participle adjective from shoot (v.). The meaning "wounded or killed by a bullet or other projectile" is from 1837.

The modern slang figurative sense of "ruined, used up, worn out" is attested by 1933, American English; the slang phrase shot to hell "in a state of collapse" is attested by 1926 (Hemingway).

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